Tuesday, October 31, 2017

Sony a7r III – First Impressions

Sony a7r III – Hands-On The big news this past week in the photography world is the Sony a7r III. Like many of my fellow journalists and content providers, I had a chance to shoot with this camera at a private Sony event. As a Sony user and a7r II owner, I was anxious to [Read More]

The post Sony a7r III – First Impressions appeared first on Luminous Landscape.



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Health Check: Aura photography - Turn to 10

Health Check reporter Barbara Morse Silva and NBC 10 News intern Madelynn Schulte recently gave “Aura Photography" a try. They visited Float in Warwick, a place that offers a numbers of modalities to help people achieve mind, body, soul and balance, ...



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Leica Q in Silver brings a new look to the compact camera

Leica has announced a new silver version of the Leica Q camera, giving customers the option of buying a model featuring a silver top plate, baseplate, and silver lens. The back of the new Leica Q Silver model is black, giving the camera what Leica describes as a 'modern take' on the two-tone color arrangement.

This rendition of the Leica Q features control elements that have been given the silver touch, while the lens sports red engraved focal length numbers and distance scale. All of this is rounded out by the same high-grip pattern found on the regular model's black leather trim. The Leica Q in Silver is otherwise identical to the standard model, including its 24MP full-frame sensor.

Leica stores, boutiques and dealers will begin offering the Leica Q in Silver late next month for $4,495 (the all-black Leica Q retails for $4,250).

Press Release

Leica Camera Announces the Leica Q in Silver

A new look for the ground-breaking compact camera complements its innovation and classically elegant style

Leica Camera reimagined the photographer’s everyday camera with the Leica Q, featuring a trailblazing design, full-frame sensor, the fastest lens in its class, and an interface for easy and intuitive handling. Today, Leica Camera announces a new style for the same innovative technology that many photographers now call their favorite Leica camera yet – the Leica Q (Typ 116) Silver Anodized.

DESIGN

A silver top plate, silver baseplate and silver lens create a striking appearance for this new version of the Leica Q, while the rear of the camera is a sleek and refined black – achieving a modern take on the classic silver and black two-tone look. The characteristic, high-grip pattern of the standard Leica Q black leather trim has been maintained, while the control elements are redesigned with a silver finish. Red engravings of the distance (feet) scale and the focal length numbers on the lens add a colorful accent to the classic look of the camera.

Functional elements within the Leica Q are designed clearly and logistically, for optimum efficiency. For example, the Leica Q control menu provides rapid access to all essential controls and enables users to program personalized settings.

TECHNICAL SPECIFICATIONS

The technical specifications of the silver Leica Q are identical to those of the standard black model. Its incredibly fast lens (the Leica Summilux 28 mm f/1.7 ASPH.) and full-frame sensor (24 megapixels) make the Leica Q a perfect tool for street photography and low light, as well as architecture and landscape shots. An integrated high resolution electronic viewfinder (3.68 megapixels) offers photographers reliable control of their composition. These features, full HD video capabilities, Wi-Fi integration and more ensure that even the finest details of every subject are captured in a snap, and easily accessible at all times.

The Leica Q in Silver will be available at Leica boutiques, stores, and dealers at the end of November 2017.



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'Nice and Simple' Is Not the Way to Go in Photography and Video - Fstoppers

You've probably heard the statement "nice and simple." Sometimes it's true, indeed, but most of the time the results and consequences from following that philosophy are not so nice, especially for those who are in the business of photography and ...



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15 Top Photography Blogs to Elevate Your Craft and Inspire Your Work - My Modern Met

After looking at the best art blogs to get your creative juices flowing, we turn to photography. And while there's no shortage of photography websites these days, which are the top contenders when it comes to inspiring creativity, keeping you in the ...



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Amazon Is Selling a Book Titled 'How to Seduce Women Through Photography' - Fstoppers

The past few weeks have seen an eruption in claims of sexual abuse throughout the creative world. Now attention is being drawn to a book sold by Amazon, entitled "An Introduction to Camera Game: How to Seduce Women Through Photography.".



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How Photos of Child Ghosts Comforted Grieving 19th-Century Parents - Slate Magazine (blog)

Among the creepiest of creepy nineteenth-century cultural artifacts, post-mortem photographs of children have all the awkwardness of staged moments of family togetherness combined with the horror of a gathering of the unburied dead. Some are so ...



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Photography club hopes to focus on campus life - The Trumpet Online

Davis said, “Lindsay and I discussed how many students on campus had expressed interest in a Photography Club. I have always been impressed at how many different types of majors are represented in my Photography I course, so I thought it would be ...



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6 Cat House Designs That Prove Just How Purr-fect They Can Actually Be

cat-house-designs

Cat houses and play structures may be great for the felines in your life, but in terms of home decor, they often leave a whole lot to be desired. So if you’re embarrassed by the sight of that jute-wrapped pole or rug-covered cat tree in your living room, you will be delighted to know that cat houses have come a long way.

Want proof? Check out these too-cool-for-school cat houses from the annual Architects for Animals’ Giving Shelter event to raise money for FixNation, which provides free spay/neuter services for homeless cats. The gorgeous cat habitats are created by a group of architects and designers in Southern California, shown off at the Herman Miller Showroom in Culver City, and then auctioned off for the charity.

While these pedigreed cat residences are all one of a kind, the architects all say it’s quite easy for anyone to knock off their work with a bit of balsa wood, scraps of felt, and a glue gun. We asked these designers about their rules on how to build a DIY cat house that satisfies the felines as well as their design-oriented owners.

1. A cat house doesn’t have to look like a ‘house’ AbransonTeiger took big PVX pipe, line it with sturdy red felt, then connected it so that it looks like a modern sculpture of a jack to humans, but looks like home to kittensAbramson Teiger Architects built this cat house out of PVX pipe.

Meghan Bob Photography

Why does a cat house need to look like a cat house? Well, it doesn’t. Why not create one that looks like modern art instead!

To build this structure, Abramson Teiger Architects took big pieces of PVX pipe, lined the insides with red felt, then connected them into a cat house that evokes a giant game of jacks.

2. A cat habitat should be playful The 'Ball of Twine, by Abramson Teiger ArchitectsThe “Ball of Twine” by Abramson Teiger Architects

Meghan Bob Photography

The beauty of this cat habitat is that kitty can not only nap in it, but also play with it, batting it right off the stand and across the room. Then there’s the ersatz hamster ball potential—the possibilities are endless!

And best of all, you will never believe how easy it would be to duplicate this giant “Ball of Twine” by Abramson Teiger Architects. Architect Douglas Teiger confided that he’d made this adorable abode by simply dragging brown twine through Elmer’s Glue and wrapping it around a beach ball. After the glue dried, he punctured and removed the ball, leaving the sphere of twine. That perfectly round opening? He taped a bucket to the beach ball. And the round base is an Elmer’s Glue–coated rope coil. Place a colorful round pillow inside, and voila! You have a shelter that’s as fun to play with as it is to look at.

3. A cat habitat can be upcycled junk Recygled cat shelter by d3architecture -- made from discarded HVAC equipment! Recycled cat shelter by d3architecture made from discarded HVAC equipment

Meghan Bob Photography

This kitty structure is the size of a sturdy piece of playground equipment, and d3architecture designed it to evoke the outdoor world of feral cats. The designers used materials found in alleys—in this case, discarded HVAC equipment. They created a wild array of tunnels and passageways for kitties to explore and play in, but at the center is a tranquil space where they can chill.

If you live in an area where you have a decent amount of space and a number of cats, feral or otherwise, this one would be relatively inexpensive and easy to assemble.

4. A cat habitat should feel good Seven Chamber Kitty Condo by HOK Product DesignSeven Chamber Kitty Condo by HOK Product Design

Meghan Bob Photography

Susan Grossinger of HOK Product Design knows that texture is important to cats, so she lined the interior of these circular chambers with the softest plush fur she could find for cozy cat napping. Then she wrapped the entire kitty condo structure with a banner of sturdy burlap, not just to help hold it together, but to also give the cats something to claw, meeting a greater number of feline kneads, er, needs.

5. A cat habitat should be cozy The "Catosphere," from Standard Architecture and DesignThe “Catosphere” from Standard Architecture and Design

Meghan Bob Photography

This “Catosphere” has a bit of a Sputnik vibe and was designed for outdoor use, but we think it would look great inside in any Mid-Century Modern setting. This one is made of a prefab concrete shell, but if you’re going to try this at home, you could easily use clay or concrete planter bowls, says architect Jeff Allsbrook. He raised the structure off the ground with brass legs, but you can use whatever inspires you at your local home improvement store.

This one has gorgeous teak pivoting wall panels, but if you don’t want to go that fancy, you could simply use wooden dowels to let the sun in and separate the ceiling from the floor. But whatever you do, don’t forget to put a comfy (washable) pillow inside. This shelter was meant for cat napping, after all.

6. A cat habitat can be fun for humans, too The UnFURled sculptural cat shelter by Perkins + Will

Meghan Bob Photography

“It’s hard to say what cats like to look at,” says Nathan Mattson of Perkins + Will, who designed the UnFURled cat structure along with colleague Louis Peiser. They came up with something sculptural that humans would like to look at, and something functional that would give cats varied experiences. By the way, humans get varied experiences as well, because those parts fit together like Tinkertoys, and the whole structure can be reconfigured to fit your space. 

The post 6 Cat House Designs That Prove Just How Purr-fect They Can Actually Be appeared first on Real Estate News & Insights | realtor.com®.



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Add different looks to your photos using only Gradient Map layer

There are several ways to color grade your photos, and plenty of different looks you can create. In this video, photographer Travis Transient will show you a simple and really versatile ways to do it – using a Gradient Map layer. All it takes is a single adjustment layer, so you can grade the images […]

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People matching artworks

Photographer Stefan Draschan spent hours hanging around museums waiting for people who matched in some way the artwork around them.

People Matching Artworks

People Matching Artworks

People Matching Artworks

People Matching Artworks

Draschan has done several other similar-ish projects, including People Touching Artworks. If I ever get really into Buddhism and mindfulness, I think my biggest obstacle in achieving enlightenment will be observing people in museums touching the art and remaining calm about it.

Tags: art   photography   Stefan Draschan

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Great Photos Don’t Need to Be Technically Perfect

Do photos always need to be technically perfect? In this 10-minute video, landscape photographer Thomas Heaton discusses whether photographers worry too much about the technicalities of a photo, forgetting about what’s actually in the image.

“The best standalone images are those that tell a story, those that make the viewer feel something,” says Heaton.

This image shows water droplets on the lens, but it’s the only part of the photo that makes the viewer appreciate the horrible, rainy conditions Heaton faced on the day. Does that make this a bad photo?

“For me, those water droplets actually really, really add to the image,” says Heaton. “I have no interest in removing them. I think they help tell the story.”

But some disagree. A user commenting on his channel said they were a “shame,” and it was that comment that prompted Heaton to make the video in the first place.

Another shot shows a storm rolling in on the coast, but Heaton admits he missed the focus “by a mile.” However, he doesn’t think it matters. The scene itself, when you’re not pixel-peeping, looks great.

“Photography is full of contradictions,” concludes Heaton. “The truth is it’s all about what happens in the moment. Don’t follow the rules, and don’t shoot for anybody other than yourself.”



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Silberra Wants to Mass Produce New B&W Film Lines

Silberra is a young analog photo company based in Russia that has big goals in the camera film industry: it just launched a $115,000 crowdfunding campaign on Indiegogo to mass produce over 6 new black-and-white film stocks.

The company was born in 2009 and adopted the Silberra brand earlier this year. There are two co-founders at the helm: photographer Vladimir Vishnevsky and businessman Konstantin Shabanov.

“Since 2009 we’ve been manufacturing supplies for analog photography,” the duo writes. “We started it in our own lab, relying on the recipes we managed to acquire from different sources: encyclopedias, chemistry books, photographic guidebooks and many others.

“We’ve been studying chemistry, reinventing the solutions, trying to bring back the variety of the developers and auxiliary solutions from the times when analog photography flourished.”

After expanding from photo chemicals to photographic film, Silberra has created Silberra PAN films in ISO 50, ISO 100, ISO 160, and (limited edition) ISO 200 versions.

These are black-and-white negative panchromatic (sensitive to all visible light) films based on modified Agfa emulsions, and over 600 frames have been shot on them by photographers around the world to demonstrate their capabilities.

Here are some sample Silberra PAN photos:

PAN50 photo by Stian-Rene Espeland 2 PAN100 photo PAN160 photo PAN200 photo

Silberra is also working on three new orthochromatic (sensitive to all visible light but red) films in the Silberra ORTA line with sensitivities of ISO 25, ISO 50, and ISO 80.

Here are some sample Silberra ORTA photos:

ORTA25 photo ORTA25 photo ORTA80 photo ORTA80 photo

Silberra PAN films are ready in 35mm format and 120 is being actively developed. Silberra ORTA films will be available in 35mm, 120, 4×5″, and 8×10″.

Having demonstrated its ability to produce film, Silberra is now turning to crowdfunding to continue research and development, begin mass production, expand the films’ reach.

If you’d like to contribute to this project, $15 will get you two rolls of PAN series film in January of 2018 if this project successfully follows through with its launch goals and promises. Higher amounts will get you more and different films.

Be warned, though: Silberra is facing an uphill battle by launching new films in an age in which the big film companies are killing off film stocks. But if you’re an analog photography enthusiast who wants to see the medium live on, Silberra is trying to make that happen.



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Track videographer almost taken out by tumbling race car

We all take risks for our art of some form or another. For some, that risk is getting into debt to satisfy gear lust. For others, the risks are a little more physical. And those physical risks often seem to present themselves for motor racing photographers and videographers. As this video clip just goes to […]

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Get a Ring Flash for only $10

Six years ago we set out a lofty goal, put a ring flash in the hands of every hot-shoe-strobe photographer in the world. This is why we made the best DIY ring flash in existence and sold it for a low price of $25 ($35 with a flash bracket). Alas, all good things must end, and once […]

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Track videographer almost taken out by tumbling race car

We all take risks for our art of some form or another. For some, that risk is getting into debt to satisfy gear lust. For others, the risks are a little more physical. And those physical risks often seem to present themselves for motor racing photographers and videographers. As this video clip just goes to […]

The post Track videographer almost taken out by tumbling race car appeared first on DIY Photography.



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How to make your digital footage look like it was shot on Super 16mm film

Shooting with real film is the dream of many filmmakers. Often, they actually get their chance, and fall in love with it. But these days, even more so than in the past, film is very expensive. Unless one is independently wealthy or wins the lottery, it’s just not viable for every project. Simon Cade at […]

The post How to make your digital footage look like it was shot on Super 16mm film appeared first on DIY Photography.



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Get a Ring Flash for only $10

Six years ago we set out a lofty goal, put a ring flash in the hands of every hot-shoe-strobe photographer in the world. This is why we made the best DIY ring flash in existence and sold it for a low price of $25 ($35 with a flash bracket). Alas, all good things must end, and once […]

The post Get a Ring Flash for only $10 appeared first on DIY Photography.



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The story behind the iconic Steve Jobs portrait

When you think of a portrait of Steve Jobs, I bet this is the image you have in mind. Photographer Albert Watson took the famous portrait in 2006, and it has become a signature photo of the famous visionary and entrepreneur. In this video from Profoto, Watson himself shares the interesting story behind this recognizable […]

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The story behind the iconic Steve Jobs portrait

When you think of a portrait of Steve Jobs, I bet this is the image you have in mind. Photographer Albert Watson took the famous portrait in 2006, and it has become a signature photo of the famous visionary and entrepreneur. In this video from Profoto, Watson himself shares the interesting story behind this recognizable […]

The post The story behind the iconic Steve Jobs portrait appeared first on DIY Photography.



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Limit yourself to get out of a creative rut

Getting stuck in a creative rut has happened to us all. It’s frustrating and it sometimes looks like it will never end. Fortunately, there are ways to make yourself inspired and start creating and enjoying the process again. Rachel and Daniel from Mango Street propose one of the ways in their latest video: restrain yourself. […]

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Emulate Slit Scan Photography for Beautifully Weird Images

The use of slit scan photography is actually quite old. It is often called line-scan, photo finish, or streak photography. Slit scan photography has a rich and colorful history rooted in chemical analog photography. This technique is often used to visualize high-speed events, such as missiles and bullets, although it is probably best known as […]

The post Emulate Slit Scan Photography for Beautifully Weird Images appeared first on DIY Photography.



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Emulate Slit Scan Photography for Beautifully Weird Images

The use of slit scan photography is actually quite old. It is often called line-scan, photo finish, or streak photography. Slit scan photography has a rich and colorful history rooted in chemical analog photography. This technique is often used to visualize high-speed events, such as missiles and bullets, although it is probably best known as […]

The post Emulate Slit Scan Photography for Beautifully Weird Images appeared first on DIY Photography.



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Readers' travel photography competition: October – the winners - The Guardian

PAUL GOLDSTEIN, JUDGE: The only thing digital cannot do as well as film is sunsets and sunrises, as the sun inevitably comes out as a white blob. However, despite the photographer's discomfort he still managed to take this the right way up – ie in ...



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Monday, October 30, 2017

How to Plan and Take Killer Sunset Photos on Your Next Vacation

Who doesn’t love a good sunset photo? There’s something about that colorful, ethereal time of day that strikes a cord with just about every person. But as appealing and ordinary as sunsets are, the ability to capture that magical time of day as a photo can be surprisingly difficult.

Sunset Photos

Photo by Martin Genev

Yes, gear and camera settings are important. However, the ability to be in the right place at the right time of day is arguably the most important factor to photographing a sunset. Below, I’ll highlight several tips for planning

Yes, gear and camera settings are important. However, the ability to be in the right place at the right time of day is arguably the most important factor to photographing a sunset. Below, I’ll highlight several tips for planning

Find the best sunset location

How to Plan and Take Killer Sunset Photos on Your Next Vacation

If you’re visiting a new town and searching for an ideal sunset spot, your best bet is to do some online searches. Do a Google image search for “[location] sunset” and see what pops up. Better yet, visit stock image sites and enter similar search queries.

In most cases, you’ll see sunset photos taken from one or two popular locations. It might take some digging to find out exactly where those spots are, but once you have the answer, you’ll know where to shoot.

What time is the sunset?

A simple Google search will tell you exactly when sunset happens in the location of your choice. Keep in mind, however, that the hour or so before sunset is the ideal time of day for most photographers, so you’ll want to show up at your chosen sunset location closer to Golden Hour.

To really hone in the ideal times of day to shoot in a new location, the PhotoPills app is a handy tool. It’s packed full of information that can help you plan and execute outdoor photo shoots.

PhotoPills Sunset Planner - How to Plan and Take Killer Sunset Photos on Your Next Vacation

Image courtesy of PhotoPills

Camera settings for sunset photos

Your ideal camera settings for shooting a sunset depend on a variety of factors, but generally speaking, these are some rules to go by.

Shoot in RAW

When it comes to shooting the sunset, one of the biggest challenges is making sure your camera captures the same warmth and vibrancy that your eyes are seeing. You can typically make White Balance and Picture Style tweaks in camera (more on those below). But just in case, it’s also a good idea to shoot in RAW to give you greater creative control when you post-process the image.

Set White Balance

Leaving your camera White Balance set to Auto might suffice. However, if the color cast of your image is looking too cool or slightly off, try setting your White Balance to Daylight or Cloudy to warm up your shot.

Shoot in Aperture Priority

What shooting mode you should use is certainly debatable, but Aperture Priority will give you greater control over the depth of field. Shooting with a small aperture (f-step of f/16 or higher) will give you a large depth of field. This is ideal if you want more of your scene in focus.

How to Plan and Take Killer Sunset Photos on Your Next Vacation

Keep ISO Low

To avoid excessive noise in your image, maintain the lowest possible ISO for the amount of light you have available. If it happens to be a cloudy sunset or you’re shooting a scene with lots of shadows, you might have to increase your ISO unless you use a tripod.

Composition tips for unique sunset photos

After you’ve got your ideal sunset spot secured, it’s time to start thinking about what kind of sunset image you want to capture.

Keep this in mind: the way that most people photograph a sunset is to whip out their camera at hand, point it directly at the sunset and start snapping away. There’s nothing wrong with capturing the sunset this way, but it doesn’t always make for unique images.

If you’re trying to think outside of the box and get an interesting sunset photo, try some of these tips.

Zoom in

How to Plan and Take Killer Sunset Photos on Your Next Vacation

For most spontaneous sunset photographers, the camera at hand is their point and shoot or cell phone. These cameras are usually equipped with wide-angle lenses. Set yourself apart from the crowd by picking an interesting feature and zooming in.

Shoot away from the sun

Instead of shooting directly into the sun, consider pointing your lens in the opposite direction. The bright and often vibrant colors generated by the sunset can make the scene in the opposite direction equally alluring, without having to compensate for shooting directly into bright light.

Wait for Blue Hour

Every photographer has heard about Golden Hour, that magical time of day just before sunset. Lesser known is Blue Hour, that brief time of day that begins roughly 10 minutes after the sun has set (and before it has risen at dawn).

Blue Hour Photography - How to Plan and Take Killer Sunset Photos on Your Next Vacation

This image was taken just after sunset during Blue Hour.

The sky isn’t as obviously colorful during Blue Hour as it is during sunset or Golden Hour. However, Blue Hour still offers a window of time when it can be best to shoot cityscapes or landscapes with deep blue tones in the sky. You will almost certainly need a tripod to shoot during Blue Hour as it is significantly darker without the sun. But the lesson here is that many more photo opportunities exist even after sunset.

Over to You

Do you have any tips for shooting sunset photos? Share your photos and tips below!

The post How to Plan and Take Killer Sunset Photos on Your Next Vacation by Suzi Pratt appeared first on Digital Photography School.



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Snappr brings on-demand photography service to Seattle; offers 30-minute sessions for $59

Snappr co-founders Matt Schiller and Ed Kearney. (Photos via Snappr)

There’s a new way to hire a photographer in Seattle.

Snappr is expanding outside of California for the first time and today announced that its on-demand photography service is now available in Seattle.

Snappr matches those looking for someone to take photos with local photographers. It charges $59 for 30 minutes; $89 for one hour; $149 for two hours (its most popular package); $209 for three hours; $269 for four hours; and $449 for seven hours. Prices go up if customers want access to all photos from a given shoot, versus only the top pictures. Snappr makes money by taking a cut of each transaction.

Some of Snappr’s photographers in Seattle.

The company originally launched in Australia and operates in several cities there. It relocated its HQ to San Francisco after being accepted into the Y Combinator accelerator earlier this year, and later expanded Snappr to the Bay Area and San Diego.

“After getting our sea legs in California, we looked for West Coast cities with tech-literate populaces where a large number of photographers had already applied for jobs and a large number of customers had already expressed interest through tools like our Machine Learning Photo Analyzer,” Snappr Marketing Manager Adam Griffith told GeekWire. “Seattle fit the bill perfectly.”

Griffith said Snappr differentiates itself from traditional photography businesses because of the ease of its platform.

“Snappr is the perfect (and often, only) solution for someone who doesn’t know any photographers, doesn’t want to spend three days researching on Yelp, but wants to hire a certified photographer to take a new profile portrait or dating profile pic or show up at a business event at their office sometime the following day,” he explained.

Snappr has raised $2.4 million to date from investors like Airtree Ventures (top firm in Australia); Zeno Ventures; Baleen Capital; Firstrock Capital; angels like Google Maps co-founder Lars Rasmussen and Zynga co-founder Justin Waldron; and others. The six-person company has 170 photographers on the platform — 100 in Australia and 70 in the U.S.



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Photographer’s lens smashed to pieces while being shipped to a buyer

I guess all of us had a misfortune or two when shipping or receiving a package. But the amount of damage Jacob Hawkins’ lens survived is hard to believe. Sheffield-based photographer sold a Tamron SP 70-300m lens on eBay. He carefully packed it in polystyrene and bubble wrap, but he got shocked when the buyer […]

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Nikon to close Chinese factory as compact camera market continues to shrink

It’s not much of a surprise that the compact camera market is getting a little more “compact”. It’s been coming for years. Global compact camera sales are down to less than a tenth of their peak. And it’s all thanks to smartphones. The cameras we carry with us all day, every day. While smartphones aren’t […]

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6 Tips To Help You Shoot In Low Light Without a Tripod

Most photographers will tell you that a tripod is invaluable and is usually the favorite accessory that they carry with them. While a tripod remains an essential piece of equipment, especially for low light photography, it is also usually the one piece of camera equipment that draws the most amount of attention.

In some scenarios and places, you won’t be allowed to use a tripod so you have to find other ways of utilizing your camera to take the photo you want. Here are six tips to help you capture photos in low light without a tripod.

6 Tips To Help You Shoot In Low Light Without a Tripod

#1 – Raise the ISO

The first option that most people will turn to is to raise the ISO setting in the camera. Principally, the ISO is the sensitivity of the camera’s sensor to light. The higher the ISO the more “sensitive” the sensor becomes to light which in turn means you can capture more detail in low light conditions. In simple terms, the darker your scene is, the higher you need your ISO. But before you start whacking your ISO up to 25,600, beware that raising the ISO also has a detrimental effect on the image.

The higher your ISO setting, the more noise you’ll see in your photo. Too much noise and your photo will begin to start looking soft. The key to being able to use ISO effectively is to balance it with other elements such as shutter speed and depth of field to be able to capture the shot you want.

Always aim to have your ISO as low as possible. Also, make sure you test your camera at different ISO settings before you use it for an actual photograph you intend to take.

Taken at ISO 4000. It was the only way that I was able to capture a photo in this dark tunnel.

#2 – Use Mirror Lock-Up and Live View Mode

Have you ever taken a photo with a tripod, with good depth of field, at a slow shutter speed only to see the final photo on your computer is slightly blurred? This is one question that has often baffled novice photographers but there is a simple solution.

When you press the button to take a photo, the mirror inside the camera flips up out of the way. This mechanical process can mean that there is a slight movement in the camera, which in turn causes a small shake, hence the blurred photo. To get around this problem, you can set your camera to Live View mode (when you get a live picture on the display of your camera) which essentially flips the mirror up permanently (until you switch off Live View mode) and means that when you take the photo you don’t get the movement the camera. Some cameras also allow you to “lock the mirror” without using the live view mode (so using your viewfinder).

This issue would be the same when photographing without a tripod in low light conditions. So in this scenario, set your camera to Live View mode/mirror lock-up to avoid that small, unwanted camera shake.

6 Tips To Help You Shoot In Low Light Without a Tripod

#3 – Use High-Speed Burst Mode

One of the great innovations of modern DSLR cameras is how much faster you can now take photos in burst mode. Using a high-speed burst mode is a really good trick to capturing decent photos in low light. But this only works when your shutter speed is just below the threshold of you shooting handheld.

For example, if you can hold your camera steady enough to take a sharp photo at 1/60th, you may be able to get away with using high-speed burst mode and using 1/45th or even 1/30th of a second. This is because with high-speed burst mode you have less time in between photos for the camera to move and often you’ll find one or two photos sharp enough for use in the middle of the burst.

Just remember to use high-speed burst as some cameras also offer low-speed burst option and aim for a good number of photos. You’ll also be well advised to try out this trick a few times to find out what your threshold is before you use it in a real-life situation.

6 Tips To Help You Shoot In Low Light Without a Tripod

#4 – Find a Ledge or Wall

Often your best bet for capturing photos in low light is to find a ledge or wall that you can rest your camera on. Not only does this mean you can have your settings at pretty much exactly what you would with a tripod, but you can also often find interesting camera angles which are different to traditional photos you’d see taken with a tripod.

One thing to be aware of is that you may need to raise your lens up slightly. Otherwise, you may see the ledge/wall in the foreground of your photo. You can use anything you can find or have with you to slightly tilt the lens upward.

6 Tips To Help You Shoot In Low Light Without a Tripod

I found a small ledge in this old church that I was able to rest the camera on to take this photo.

#5 – Use Your Bag

Over time you’ll begin to pick up tricks and techniques that you will use in your photography. One of the most useful that I have found has been to simply use my backpack. Put it on the floor and put your camera on top and you have a quick tripod without all the attention that a tripod brings.

This trick has been really useful in buildings and places where tripods are not allowed like museums or galleries. You can put your bag on benches and even rest it on a branch of a tree (as I did once).

6 Tips To Help You Shoot In Low Light Without a Tripod

#6 – Train Yourself

Like anything else photography is something that you can improve your skills. This is also true of actually being able to hold the camera steady. So start by practicing your stance and make sure that you are holding the camera as securely and comfortably as you can.

Work on your composure and try to teach yourself to relax when you are going to take the photo. By practicing over and over again you may find that you actually can hold the camera at slightly slower speeds than you were able to before.

6 Tips To Help You Shoot In Low Light Without a Tripod

Conclusion

There’s no question that if you want to capture the best possible photos at the best quality in low light conditions, then a tripod will give you the best results. But in situations when that might not be possible, using the tips and tricks above might help you capture the shots you need.

Anything else? What tricks do you use to capture photos in low light conditions without a tripod?

The post 6 Tips To Help You Shoot In Low Light Without a Tripod by Kav Dadfar appeared first on Digital Photography School.



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