Saturday, September 30, 2017

New York voters have no 1st Amendment right to snap ballot-booth selfies - Ars Technica

The judge also set aside a challenge by voters to New York City's law barring the public, but not the accredited press, from photographing polling sites. "The City Board's policy prohibiting photography is not a content-based restriction and is not in ...



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The Photography of Fred Cray - Chronogram

For several years, Brooklyn photographer Fred Cray has traveled to an unfamiliar city to spend the summer. He's stayed in Tokyo, Rome, and Berlin, taking photos of the landscapes. The architecture. The people. Snapshots of everyday life. “If you live ...



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Art Review: The street photography of John Elder - Reading Eagle

Black-and-white photography by West Reading resident John Elder is viewing through Oct. 15 at the GoggleWorks Cohen Gallery. Elder, known primarily for his street photography in metro areas, is presenting work from early in his career to the present ...



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Man accused of running fraudulent photography kiosk at the Capital City Mall - PennLive.com

Police in Lower Allen Township are investigating a fraudulent photography kiosk at the Capital City Mall, and the owner of the business is wanted by police. Police said the Elayne & Charles photography kiosk was conducting business at the mall in August.



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CLICK! Triangle month-long Photography Festival opens this weekend in North Carolina - imaging resource

The CLICK! Triangle Photography Festival launches today in North Carolina. With over 70 curated events taking place throughout the month of October in Durham, Raleigh and Chapel Hill, North Carolina, the festival is one of the largest in the country ...



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Five Simples Hacks for Creative Photography - Fstoppers

Are you looking for different ways to add some creativity to your work? There are several different methods to add special effects to your photos, both in-camera and in postproduction later with Photoshop or other photo manipulation software. Depending ...



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New Japanese Anime to Feature Realistic Canon Cameras

There’s a new anime series coming out in Japan that may have the most accurately depicted cameras of all time. The reason is because Canon was recruited a consultant for ensuring that all the cameras and photography in the show are realistic.

Just Because! is a new original anime series that’s set to debut in Japan on October 5th, 2017. One of the main characters, Ena Komiya, is a high school sophomore who’s an avid member of the school’s photography club.

But the club has fallen upon tough times and is at risk of being disbanded. In order to save the photo club, Komiya plans to enter her photos in a photography competition.

DC Watch reports that Komiya’s main camera will be a $729 PowerShot G5 X high-end compact camera. Other Canon products to make an appearance will include the Canon 7D Mark II (as a popular camera in the photo department), EF 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6L IS II lens, and EOS M6 mirrorless camera.

Canon worked with the show to ensure that the scenes depicting cameras and photography won’t make photography lovers cringe. Instead, you’ll be treated to an extremely high level of realism.

Here’s a short 30-second trailer for the show in which Komiya makes a brief appearance with the 7D:

If you’re based in the US and are interested in watching Just Because!, you’ll be able to watch it through Amazon’s Anime Strike service.



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How to Dramatically Shape the Light of a Landscape Photo in Lightroom

Lightroom’s adjustment brushes allow you to apply local adjustments to specific areas in your photos — great for landscape photography. In this 18-minute tutorial from PiXimperfect, learn how to use the brushes to “shape light” in landscapes.

In this example, the photo in question has some blown highlights and lost details in the shadows. But quite a bit can be recovered with some Lightroom editing.

Pressing ‘K’ will open the adjustment brush tool, and you can then paint a mask over the areas in the image you want to adjust. Once you’ve done that, move the sliders (the same ones you’d see for a more global adjustment) to create the edit. Ensuring that your adjustment brush is sufficiently feathered will ensure the changes look natural.

If you want to add warmth and color to an image, such as bolstering the look of a sunset, you can simply locally adjust the white balance. Just select a new brush, pull up the temperature slider, and paint on the orange.

If you adjust the tint for the brush you’ve used to introduce a white balance change, you can make it a little more magenta in color. This introduces some nice, subtle pink/red tones into the shot.

And don’t forget about the “flow” setting for your adjustment brush. It describes the opacity of the adjustment, so if you have a flow value of 10, you’re painting on your change at 10% opacity. You’d have to paint 10 times to get the same effect as 100% opacity (or flow). This is a great way to reduce the intensity of your change.

When you’re done, your changes can look something like this:

The secret is to keep in mind where the light is coming from in the original photo when you’re making the adjustments — that way you can keep things looking natural.



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Crediting Retouchers: What’s the big deal?

-Article originally from: JPBlog.co.uk. Hey Pixels! Before we begin, I must start this piece off by saying that I’m referring specifically to collaborations on social media/magazines, where the aim is to grow your fanbase/audiences, when appropriate, and all parties agree on written credit.   Hello guys and girls! *waves* welcome back to another blog post! […]

The post Crediting Retouchers: What’s the big deal? appeared first on DIY Photography.



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Crediting Retouchers: What’s the big deal?

-Article originally from: JPBlog.co.uk. Hey Pixels! Before we begin, I must start this piece off by saying that I’m referring specifically to collaborations on social media/magazines, where the aim is to grow your fanbase/audiences, when appropriate, and all parties agree on written credit.   Hello guys and girls! *waves* welcome back to another blog post! […]

The post Crediting Retouchers: What’s the big deal? appeared first on DIY Photography.



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TWA lounge opens at One World Trade Center; airport hotel to follow

The "TWA lounge at 1WTC" is equal parts museum and timepiece. It features memorabilia as well as TWA-themed lounge areas on the building's 86th floor.

     
 
 


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5 Reasons for Lightroom Photographers to Use the Edit In Photoshop Feature

Since its Version 1.0 release in 2006, Adobe Lightroom has gone from strength to strength, firmly establishing itself as the go-to software for photographers around the globe. With each new update, you’ll be relieved to find you have fewer reasons for awakening the software’s fuller-figured big brother, Photoshop CC.

That said, there are some limitations with Lightroom that have stood the test of time. Thankfully, with more signups for the Creative Cloud Photography plan, there are now few photographers without access to both solutions. But for the times you need it, here are five reasons you’ll likely find yourself firing up Photoshop CC for better results.

1 – Cloning and Healing

Lightroom is a whiz at removing simple sensor spots from that top left corner of your images (Nikon users, you know what I’m talking about!). Punching Q then A allows me to quickly visualize any distracting spots with the handy white on black overlay, and their removal is typically a swift one-click solution using the Spot Healing tool.

However, the same cannot be said when attempting to remove distractions from more complex textures such as dust spots in the grass, for example, or people, as in the image below. For those situations, I rely on the smarter algorithms and expanded capabilities of Photoshop.

Cloning before - 5 Reasons for Lightroom Photographers to Use the Edit In Photoshop Feature

Want to feel like the only person at Angkor Wat? Then, you’ll need Photoshop!

To remove and replace objects that Lightroom cannot handle, start by right-clicking the image and choosing Edit in Photoshop. Then create a duplicate layer (CTRL/CMD + J) of your image in Photoshop (I generally do this every time I start processing so I can always get back to the original if I make a mistake or don’t like the result).

Next, erase the distraction with the Eraser Tool (E) so that you can see a “missing piece” where the culprit used to lie (be sure to turn off the visibility of the original background layer if nothing appears to have been erased). Select the area using the wand tool (W) and then in the menu bar at the top of your screen choose Select > Modify > Expand (choose around 5 pixels as your setting).

Next, choose Edit > Fill and select “Content-Aware” in the Contents dropdown list. Hit OK and Photoshop will attempt to replace what you’ve erased with something sensible.

Cloning demo - 5 Reasons for Lightroom Photographers to Use the Edit In Photoshop Feature

A before, during, and after shot showing the simple removal of people from an image using Erase and Content-Aware Fill.

I’ve been able to seamlessly remove crowds of people from the image you see here using this technique, and the process took only around two minutes. Whereas Lightroom relies on finding a similar texture it can use to cover up distractions/blemishes, Photoshop uses its clever algorithms to create its own texture.

Cloning final - 5 Reasons for Lightroom Photographers to Use the Edit In Photoshop Feature

Going, going, gone! Photoshop makes light work of the unwanted people in the image.

2 – Digital Blending

Sometimes you just can’t quite capture enough dynamic range in your image to get away with a single exposure (at least not without introducing an unacceptable amount of noise or strange artifacts). While Lightroom has attempted to cater to those who wish to combine exposures with the introduction of HDR Photo Merge, using the feature can sometimes lead to incredibly flat images that are tricky to process (and in the case of the image you see below, caused the sun to completely disappear by virtue of it not appearing in both of the photographs).

Hdr both frames - 5 Reasons for Lightroom Photographers to Use the Edit In Photoshop Feature

Pulling up the shadows on the darker of these two exposures would introduce too much noise, and so HDR seemed the way to go.

Lightroom hdr attempt - 5 Reasons for Lightroom Photographers to Use the Edit In Photoshop Feature

…if only it wasn’t for Lightroom’s attempt to fix global warming.

Lightroom hdr after post-production - 5 Reasons for Lightroom Photographers to Use the Edit In Photoshop Feature

The plight of a freezing earth aside, even after post-production in Lightroom, the blended exposure looks flat and uninteresting.

The advanced masking abilities of Photoshop, combined with a technique called Luminosity Masking makes combining exposures much simpler. Using this technique, you choose exactly what appears from each exposure, so blending images that have uncommon elements (as in the case of the sun in the example image) is simple.

Photoshop hdr blend - 5 Reasons for Lightroom Photographers to Use the Edit In Photoshop Feature

Not only is the sun retained, but the image looks punchier overall, too.

3 – Advanced Tone and Color Control

The local adjustment tools in Lightroom including the Adjustment Brush (K), Graduated Filter (M) and Radial Filter (Shift+M) give you far less need for Photoshop than was the case before they were introduced. They are excellent targeting tools, yet they all suffer a major weakness – there is no access to HSL (Hue, Saturation, and Luminosity) adjustments.

In daytime landscape images, you’ll often want to deepen the blue of the sky. While this can be done using the HSL panel, the problem is that blue is not a color found exclusively above the horizon, as is the case with the walls and clothing in the example image below. The only way I could deepen the blue here would also cause detrimental effects to the blue everywhere else. Targeting the sky with the Adjustment Brush didn’t give me access to the necessary HSL sliders.

Color control before - http://ift.tt/2lmsuqT

I wanted to bring a bit of life to the sky in this image. But in Lightroom, there is no way to adequately control the blues without affecting the same tones in other areas of the image.

Color can be better controlled in Photoshop by hitting Select > Color Range, then using the eyedropper tool to select a color you want to affect in isolation. You can then create an adjustment layer of your choice to affect the selected area; most often you’ll find a Hue/Saturation adjustment is the best method.

The benefit of this last method is a dramatic one: Whereas in Lightroom you can only make wholesale adjustments, i.e. changes that affect the entirety of the image, to Hue, Saturation, and Luminosity, you aren’t subject to the same limitation in Photoshop. By selecting an appropriate color, then masking out the effect in undesirable areas, you’ll retain more control, as is the case with the image below.

Color control after - 5 Reasons for Lightroom Photographers to Use the Edit In Photoshop Feature

Targeting only specific areas while retaining full access to every adjustment Photoshop offers is hugely appealing. Note the sky is darkened here but not the wall or people’s clothing.

To achieve my aim, I simply created a Hue/Saturation adjustment layer and then masked away the effect from everywhere but the sky. I’d tried all manner of adjustments in Lightroom but could only get the sky to look how I wanted at the expense of adding too much blue elsewhere.

Another great option when this happens is to simply create two virtual copies in Lightroom, one with the sky (or another problem area) as you want it, and another before you did the damage with the other edit. You can then blend the two together in Photoshop.

4 – Stitching Panoramas

When Adobe announced they’d be adding the Panorama Photo Merge feature to Lightroom, I figured that’d be yet one more thing scratched from my “Must use Edit in Photoshop” list. Alas, it wasn’t to be, predominantly because of the likelihood of “blank canvas” – the phenomenon where you’ll find blank, white space in your Lightroom panoramas. Try it for yourself. CTRL/CMD + Click to select all of the images you wish to stitch, then right-click and select Merge > Panorama. I bet there’s an area missing from the photograph.

Lr pano demo - 5 Reasons for Lightroom Photographers to Use the Edit In Photoshop Feature

Here you see Lightroom’s attempt at creating a 6-frame panorama.

The effect is caused by the distortion inherent to some degree in every lens, and Photoshop will produce near identical results. Where Photoshop excels, however, is in its ability to offer a more flexible solution. In Lightroom, you are left to merely crop away the now-useless areas. But in Photoshop you can use the same Content-Aware Fill method described in #1 above to cleverly re-create a convincing replacement area of sky (although you may want to try expanding your selection by 20 or so pixels, as opposed to the 5px recommended for removing smaller items).

Left to the solutions in Lightroom, I’d have been forced to crop away more of the sky than I’d have liked in this image. With Photoshop I was even able to replicate some tricky texture in the water at the bottom of the frame. I still needed to crop away a little of the image, but nowhere near as much.

Pano in photoshop - 5 Reasons for Lightroom Photographers to Use the Edit In Photoshop Feature

Pano complete - 5 Reasons for Lightroom Photographers to Use the Edit In Photoshop Feature

Photoshop’s Content-Aware Fill allowed me to retain much more of the final image and forced less cropping.

5 – Chromatic Aberrations

Lightroom generally does a pretty good job of dealing with chromatic aberration, the color fringing that can appear where dark and light tones meet. You’ll often see this in daytime cityscapes where the top edges of buildings meet a bright sky, for example, usually manifesting itself as a green or purple edge straying into the brighter tone.

Chromatic aberration before - 5 Reasons for Lightroom Photographers to Use the Edit In Photoshop Feature

While this nun is a holy person, the blue glow on the shoulder is a bit much.

Lightroom has a couple of ways of dealing with this. First, there’s the Remove Chromatic Aberration checkbox in the Lens Corrections panel. I’d say 90% of the time, this is enough to correct the problem. Where the fringing persists, heading into the manual tab of the same panel allows you to grab the Fringe color Selector (the eye-dropper-like icon) and click on the offending area.

This will generally fix a more complex problem, but every once in a while you’ll encounter fringing so stubborn that Lightroom can’t handle it. This happens most frequently with blue fringing, which Lightroom is pretty much powerless against. Fortunately, blue fringing is quite rare, but it does happen.

Fringe color selector - 5 Reasons for Lightroom Photographers to Use the Edit In Photoshop Feature

Lightroom is powerless against the dreaded Blue Glow!

You could try to desaturate the offending edge with Lightroom’s adjustment brush but you run the risk of accidentally straying into the surrounding area. Alternatively, you could try to completely desaturate the blue and cyan in the HSL panel. In this case, I didn’t want to do either of those as it would put my blue-green background at risk, making it look far too much like color-select for my liking.

Photoshop affords so much more control in fixing this problem. It’s as simple as heading to the menu bar to hit Select > Color Range and then clicking on the color fringing with the eyedropper tool that appears automatically. This will create a selection based on that very blue causing the problem.

By altering the “Fuzziness” you’re basically setting color sensitivity. The lower the number, the more precisely Photoshop will select that color; the higher the number, the more leeway you give the software to find similar colors. Don’t worry if there’s an identical or similar color elsewhere in the image that Photoshop picks up on; it’s easy to mask that out later.

Once you see that your mask has isolated the problem area well enough, open a Hue/Saturation adjustment layer, which should have automatically applied your selection as a mask. Reduce saturation in the Blues and Cyans until the problem is gone. If you’ve accidentally desaturated some other important area of your photograph, click on your mask, grab the black brush, and mask it out. Easy.

Color range with mask - 5 Reasons for Lightroom Photographers to Use the Edit In Photoshop Feature

Targeting doesn’t get any easier.

Chromatic aberration demo

The nun’s blue glow is successfully removed. I’m not quite sure how she’d feel about this.

Conclusion

The next time one of the few remaining weakness of Lightroom is exposed, you can try one of the above techniques so the software doesn’t have to get in the way of your vision.

Have you found any other Lightroom limitations? Please share in the comments below.

The post 5 Reasons for Lightroom Photographers to Use the Edit In Photoshop Feature by Chris Cusick appeared first on Digital Photography School.



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42 Maple Center For The Arts Featuring New Photography Exhibit - Caledonian Record

1988) is a documentary photographer based in New Hampshire's North Country, examining the human connection with the environment. A 2012 alumna of Central Michigan University, March worked as a photography intern at newspapers in Michigan, ...



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Single mother creates out of this world portaits of her children and herself

Recently I got to speak to Gilmar Smith. I have been following Gilmar’s work online for a while now and I love it. I wanted to share with you all the creativity and imagination she brings to her images.  Gilmar describes herself as a self-taught photographer, Photoshop addict and a social media junkie specializing in […]

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Single mother creates out of this world portaits of her children and herself

Recently I got to speak to Gilmar Smith. I have been following Gilmar’s work online for a while now and I love it. I wanted to share with you all the creativity and imagination she brings to her images.  Gilmar describes herself as a self-taught photographer, Photoshop addict and a social media junkie specializing in […]

The post Single mother creates out of this world portaits of her children and herself appeared first on DIY Photography.



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How camera cages are built

Earlier this year I was visiting a few camera gear factories in Shenzen China. Aside from getting my phone nicked in a cab ride, it was an enlightening experience. One of those factories was the Small Rig factory. If you are following the blog, you know how much we love our A7 cage (and a bunch […]

The post How camera cages are built appeared first on DIY Photography.



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How camera cages are built

Earlier this year I was visiting a few camera gear factories in Shenzen China. Aside from getting my phone nicked in a cab ride, it was an enlightening experience. One of those factories was the Small Rig factory. If you are following the blog, you know how much we love our A7 cage (and a bunch […]

The post How camera cages are built appeared first on DIY Photography.



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Photography's color problem - Colorado Springs Independent

At the very beginning, photography was black and white — or a variation of. It wasn't until the mid-20th century that color was easily reproduced and somewhat accurate to the scenes being photographed. If you look back at black and white images of old ...



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Photography Expanded: Distinct Approaches opens at the Center - Valley Roadrunner

The Museum at the California Center for the Arts, Escondido will open Photography Expanded: Distinct Approaches, on Sept. 29 at 6 p.m.. The exhibition features a select group of contemporary Southern California artists who are taking the manipulation ...



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Friday, September 29, 2017

Man accused of running fraudulent photography business at Capital City Mall - ABC27

CAMP HILL, Pa. (WHTM) – A man is wanted by police in Cumberland County for a running a fraudulent photography business at a mall. The Lower Allen Township Police Department has been investigating Elayne & Charles Photography, which was ...
Lower Allen Township police seek suspected photography scammer FOX43.com

all 2 news articles »


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Why Godox is succeeding where Yongnuo failed

The flash market used to be rather simple. You go to one company for speedlights, usually your camera manufacturer or a specialist brand like Metz. Then, you go to another company, such as Bowens and Elinchrom, for strobes when you needed more power. The strobe market stayed largely stable, but then Yongnuo came along and […]

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The Stunning Images From an Underwater Photography Competition - Fstoppers

Scuba Diving magazine just released the winners of their thirteenth annual underwater photography competition. This year's “Through Your Lens” contest features incredible images taken over this past year from photographers throughout the world.



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Dead Rising 4 to add photography challenges and other fan-requested features - PC Gamer

In his review last year, Leif praised Dead Rising 4 for recapturing the playful side of series despite being "too easy" overall. Capcom Vancouver is now adding a glut of complimentary player-requested features in a bid to change that. 'Human Enemy ...

and more »


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5 Things to Consider Before Buying a New Camera

I have been a very happy Sony customer for the last 2+ years. My a7R continues to serve me well, but I am inching closer to an upgrade. I know the a7R II is an awesome camera. I’ve read the reviews. There are photographers I follow and respect who rave about it. I’ve held it in my hands and it feels good. And there’s even the recently rumored a7R III.

However, I must also consider the “surround” that goes with a new camera body. Especially when a new camera body means an increase in megapixels. Having more megapixels comes with a cost. I think we photographers often fail to consider the ripples of a new camera body.

There is more to the decision than just the camera body, and that’s what prompted me to write this post. So let’s go. Here are 5 things you should consider before making your upgrade.

1. Storage Space

Hard drive space is the obvious impact when the new camera body you are considering has a higher megapixel count. More pixels mean larger photo files. In my example, the Sony a7R produces 36MB RAW files. The a7R II pumps out 42MB RAW files — that’s about a 16% increase. Non-trivial for disk storage, but manageable. But if I dabble with uncompressed RAW files, I’m looking at more like 80MB per shutter press. I’ll hazard a guess the a7R III will produce even larger RAW files, on the order of 50MB to 70MB.

What about memory cards? How large are the ones you own? If you are still shooting with 32GB memory cards, that may be a problem. Using my example again, my a7R could take around 900 photos before filling a 32GB card. That drops to more like 750 with the a7R II. Or a mere 400 for those 80MB uncompressed RAW beasts.

Storage is relatively cheap, but for prolific photographers (think sports, wildlife, weddings), you may be eating up disk space and memory cards faster than Pac-Man eats dots. Projecting your storage needs is easy enough math. Just know those storage needs come with a price tag beyond the camera body — and they are recurring costs.

2. Lens Compatibility

Many of us that have been into photography for a long time have an investment in lenses. Maybe you’ve scrimped and saved to get some really good glass. If you are considering a camera body from another vendor, you need to consider lens compatibility. A prime example is moving from a DSLR system to a mirrorless system.

A new camera body may push the limits of your current glass.

All things being equal, it’s probably preferable to protect the investment you’ve made in lenses. There are lens mount adapters out there. Read the spec sheets. Adapters have gotten better and better. However, you have to do your homework. Does the adapter support your lenses? What features (e.g. auto-focus) will or won’t work? What features (e.g. focus speed) are hampered by the adapter?

3. Lens Resolution

You are drooling over that new, high megapixel camera. And maybe you are able to keep using your existing glass with an adapter. However… can your current lenses resolve enough detail for that big new sensor? A top-notch sensor paired with a lens of lower optical quality won’t produce optimal images. Good glass from a few years back may or may not be up to the task of resolving 40 or 50 megapixels of data.

In simple terms, the quality of your photo is only as good as the weakest link in the chain.

DxOMark added the “perceptual megapixel” to their lens ratings several years ago. A nice feature of the DxOMark site is you can check the ratings of a lens as mounted on a variety of camera bodies (assuming the combination has been tested). I checked my Sony lenses on DxOMark and the perceptual megapixel (sharpness) values increased going from the a7R to the a7R II. Sony built the lenses thinking ahead to larger sensors. Did they think all the way ahead to a rumored 50-60MP a7R III sensor? We will see.

I also temper by-the-numbers ratings by asking other photographers I know and trust that use the gear I’m considering. Of course, I can only ask about cameras that exist. I have plenty of photo friends that use the a7R II. If I jump on the a7R III train early, I won’t have much tribal knowledge to tap into.

4. Computing Horsepower Is your computer up to the task of pushing more megapixels?

The power of your computer is something all to often overlooked by photographers when moving to a new camera body. Imagine going from a 20-megapixel to a 40-megapixel camera. You have doubled the size of every photo you are processing. Can your computer handle that?

In this example, you are asking your machine to do double the work. Of course, you don’t want to have a slow processing experience. Yet, if your system is a few years old, you will probably experience sluggish behavior. In my opinion, the days are gone in the photography world where we can expect to use the same computer for more than a few years without an upgrade (or tolerating a slower experience).

I try my best to get 4 years out of a desktop machine… and that’s pushing it. When I purchase a system, I get the maximum config, especially for components I know I can’t easily swap in and out to upgrade myself. I also add loads of memory and future-proof my system as much as possible. I’m not looking forward to my next iMac update — memory won’t be user replaceable. Apple’s pricing on RAM is… well, let’s just say off market prices.

If you’re able, get a few test files from the body you are considering. You may be able to find some online. Or find a photographer friend that is using the camera you are considering and try working with the files on your machine. Visit a local camera store and ask to take a few snaps to your own memory card. Or rent the body for a weekend and give your cataloging and processing workflow a real-world test. Another idea is to stitch together a few panoramas and take those through your workflow. They are morally equivalent to large RAW files with lots of pixels to push.

And prepare yourself: you may either need a computer upgrade as well or live with a sluggish experience for a while.

5. What Problem Are You Trying to Solve?

The last consideration on the list should be the first thing you think about. Why are you getting a new camera body? When I consider a new gear purchase, I ask myself what photographic problem the new gear will solve.

Ask yourself what limitation a new camera body will help you overcome.

Sometimes the reasons are easy to rattle off. Your current camera 10 years old and reaching the end of its life. Or your current camera is flat out broken! Other times, the benefits are nebulous, the perceived problems are more subtle. You ask yourself “Do I really need that gear? Or do I just want it because it’s new?”

Let’s use me as an example. Why am I considering an upgrade when I’m quite happy with the a7R? I have a few reasons.

1. I need a second full-frame camera. My current backup body is a crop sensor system, an A6000. It works great and I like the A6000, too. However, when I’m traveling for a shoot, I’m always a little nervous that a problem with my a7R means I lose my full-frame goodness.

2. I want the in-body stabilization of the a7R II or a7R III (I’m assuming the a7R III will have this feature). This will allow me to take better handheld shots. My landscape work is always on a tripod. However, when I travel, I shoot handheld much of the day. And my hands aren’t all that steady.

3. This is part of a grander plan for my cameras and my photography. Once I have a new full frame camera, it will become my main body and the a7R will become my backup. I then will convert my A6000 to infrared and explore a whole new (to me) arena of photography.

So ask yourself: what problem will that new camera body solve for you? It is a way to temper that desire for a new “shiny object”. You might know this as GAS (gear acquisition syndrome).

Parting Thoughts

Buying a new camera is fun. It’s exciting. It can reinvigorate your photography. It can get you off the couch and out making photographs. However, don’t overlook the ripples a new camera creates. There may be costs beyond the camera itself in lenses, disk space, or computing power. Weigh those costs against the value of solving the photographic problem you have with your current system. And after all that, if a new body makes sense… buy it, enjoy it, and make great work.

About the author: Scott Davenport is a landscape photographer and photo educator based in San Diego, California. The opinions expressed in this article are solely those of the author. You can find more of his work and writing on his website, blog, Instagram, Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube. This article was also published here.



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This amazing photographer was born with no legs or hands

Sometimes, you come across people that just make you go “wow” and completely rethink your whole outlook life and passion. One such person is 24 year old Indonesian photographer, Achmad Zulkarnain. Born with no legs or hands, he doesn’t let it stop him from pursuing his dreams. Achmad, who also goes by Dzoel, doesn’t see himself […]

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Barrel-shaped wooden pod retreat in France inspired by real life 'bird charmer'

Mr Plocq's Caballon, Loire river estuary, Aurélie Poirrier, Igor-Vassili Pouchkarevtch-Dragoche, Vincent O’Connor, pod living, pod cabins, pod getways france, wooden pods, off grid retreats, off grid pods, camping pods, Émile Plocq, bird watching pods, movable housing, Loirestua, wooden pods, bird watching, off grid wooden pods

Mr Plocq’s Caballon is a beautiful 160-square-foot wooden pod located on the banks of the Loire river estuary. The pod’s unique design was inspired by the life of real-life bird charmer Émile Plocq, who supposedly built his own boat to follow migrating birds to Africa. Architects Aurélie Poirrier, Igor-Vassili Pouchkarevtch-Dragoche, and Vincent O’Connor created the barrel-shaped retreat by combining techniques used in naval and airplane carpentry, resulting in a fun boat-like hull topped with a transparent “cockpit” shell.

The architectural team designed the pod for the local “Imaginary Nights” celebration, an annual event hosted by tourism board, Loirestu. Every year, the festival chooses a fun movable housing concept to be used as a guest retreat located along the Loire estuary in the west of France. This year, Mr Plocq’s Caballon’s inventive backstory, along with its great compact design, earned the pod its place in the event.

Related: Egg-shaped GreenPod office lets you work from almost anywhere

Mr Plocq's Caballon, Loire river estuary, Aurélie Poirrier, Igor-Vassili Pouchkarevtch-Dragoche, Vincent O’Connor, pod living, pod cabins, pod getways france, wooden pods, off grid retreats, off grid pods, camping pods, Émile Plocq, bird watching pods, movable housing, Loirestua, wooden pods, bird watching, off grid wooden pods

The tiny pod‘s barrel shape was strategic to optimize the interior space despite its compact volume. The design basically comprises a ship-like wooden hull on the bottom, topped by a transparent cockpit partially covered by white canvas. Access to the interior is by a double swing door that opens up vertically as the steps fold out to the ground. There are two private areas in the interior, the bedroom and the bathroom, which are separated by a wooden door. The bedroom is located in the cockpit area, whose transparent glazing allows guests to sleep under the stars.

Mr Plocq's Caballon, Loire river estuary, Aurélie Poirrier, Igor-Vassili Pouchkarevtch-Dragoche, Vincent O’Connor, pod living, pod cabins, pod getways france, wooden pods, off grid retreats, off grid pods, camping pods, Émile Plocq, bird watching pods, movable housing, Loirestua, wooden pods, bird watching, off grid wooden pods

The remaining hull space is the small bathroom with a sink and dry toilet, which is reached by a hollow 360° rotating door inserted into double wall behind the bed. The innovative “shower airlock” door allows guests ultimate privacy when turned inwards towards the bathroom.

+ Aurélie Poirrier

+ Igor-Vassili Pouchkarevtch-Dragoche

+ Vincent O’Connor

Via Archdaily

Photography by Corentin Schieb, Aurélie Poirrier

Mr Plocq's Caballon, Loire river estuary, Aurélie Poirrier, Igor-Vassili Pouchkarevtch-Dragoche, Vincent O’Connor, pod living, pod cabins, pod getways france, wooden pods, off grid retreats, off grid pods, camping pods, Émile Plocq, bird watching pods, movable housing, Loirestua, wooden pods, bird watching, off grid wooden pods

Mr Plocq's Caballon, Loire river estuary, Aurélie Poirrier, Igor-Vassili Pouchkarevtch-Dragoche, Vincent O’Connor, pod living, pod cabins, pod getways france, wooden pods, off grid retreats, off grid pods, camping pods, Émile Plocq, bird watching pods, movable housing, Loirestua, wooden pods, bird watching, off grid wooden pods

Mr Plocq's Caballon, Loire river estuary, Aurélie Poirrier, Igor-Vassili Pouchkarevtch-Dragoche, Vincent O’Connor, pod living, pod cabins, pod getways france, wooden pods, off grid retreats, off grid pods, camping pods, Émile Plocq, bird watching pods, movable housing, Loirestua, wooden pods, bird watching, off grid wooden pods

Mr Plocq's Caballon, Loire river estuary, Aurélie Poirrier, Igor-Vassili Pouchkarevtch-Dragoche, Vincent O’Connor, pod living, pod cabins, pod getways france, wooden pods, off grid retreats, off grid pods, camping pods, Émile Plocq, bird watching pods, movable housing, Loirestua, wooden pods, bird watching, off grid wooden pods

Mr Plocq's Caballon, Loire river estuary, Aurélie Poirrier, Igor-Vassili Pouchkarevtch-Dragoche, Vincent O’Connor, pod living, pod cabins, pod getways france, wooden pods, off grid retreats, off grid pods, camping pods, Émile Plocq, bird watching pods, movable housing, Loirestua, wooden pods, bird watching, off grid wooden pods



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This amazing photographer was born with no legs or hands

Sometimes, you come across people that just make you go “wow” and completely rethink your whole outlook life and passion. One such person is 24 year old Indonesian photographer, Achmad Zulkarnain. Born with no legs or hands, he doesn’t let it stop him from pursuing his dreams. Achmad, who also goes by Dzoel, doesn’t see himself […]

The post This amazing photographer was born with no legs or hands appeared first on DIY Photography.



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Here is the first Gopo Hero6 review

With the release of the new HERO6 Black, GoPro continues to advance and refine what we can expect out of an action camera. Released just one year after the HERO5 Black, the HERO6 Black has all the right upgrades in all the right places. First, let’s look at what hasn’t changed. The HERO6 retains the same small design with rounded corners […]

The post Here is the first Gopo Hero6 review appeared first on DIY Photography.



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Thursday, September 28, 2017

AP Exclusive: Chicago Nanny No Accidental Photographer - U.S. News & World Report

CHICAGO (AP) — Yawning gaps in the life story of enigmatic Chicago nanny Vivian Maier, whose gritty street photography became a sensation and the subject of an Oscar-nominated documentary only after she died, led to early depictions of her as a ...

and more »


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Northern lights provide a glowing auroral sendoff to Seattle’s summer weather

Aurora over SeattleNorthern lights glow in a time-exposure photo that includes whirling star trails. (NWS Seattle Photo via Twitter)

Seattle’s final fling with hot weather reached its climax with a celestial fireworks show on Wednesday night, in the form of an auroral display that benefited from clear skies as well as a strong geomagnetic storm.

The northern lights were pumped up by a wave of electrically charged particles thrown off by the sun a couple of days earlier — a phenomenon technically known as a coronal hole high-speed stream.

SpaceWeather.com reported that heightened auroras were spotted along the northern tier of the U.S., including Washington as well as Montana, Minnesota, Wisconsin, Illinois and Michigan.

Seattle’s auroral glow might have seemed faint to the naked eye, but long-exposure photography brought out shimmering colors, as seen in these pictures and videos:

A time lapse of the #aurora reaching a crescendo of sorts around the 11 o'clock hour last night. What a sight! http://pic.twitter.com/n6G2gDm69u

— NWS Seattle (@NWSSeattle) September 28, 2017

Some images from last night… http://pic.twitter.com/3wTWBYZbpH

— Skunkbayweather (@Skunkbayweather) September 28, 2017

A touch of Northern Lights over Seattle early this morning made for an even more picturesque Emerald City skyline http://pic.twitter.com/hYlDUQFT2k

— Tim Durkan (@timdurkan) September 28, 2017

2 Minute Aurora Video @WeatherNation @WunderCave @TamithaSkov @NorthLightAlert @TWCChrisWarren @StormHour
HD: https://t.co/CO8hqeHk3P http://pic.twitter.com/uC70s8o8ru

— Skunkbayweather (@Skunkbayweather) September 28, 2017

@NWSSeattle Port Gamble S’Klallam Tribe #aurora #NorthernLights http://pic.twitter.com/fXJig3GUIT

— Joseph Price (@Greyrock360) September 28, 2017

Aurora Borealis from Port Angeles, WA Wednesday evening at about 11 p.m. @ScottSKOMO #Auroraborealis http://pic.twitter.com/BZujNIEGfO

— Jay Cline (@ClineNorthwest) September 28, 2017

#Aurora over #Seattle & #ferry 9/27/17 @komonews @KIRO7Seattle @Q13FOX @KING5Seattle @ScottSKOMO @ShannonODKOMO @KellyKIRO7 @MorganKIRO7 http://pic.twitter.com/vCfs4XmLhT

— Wild NW Beauty Photo (@WildNWBeauty) September 28, 2017

Amazing #SeattleAurora tonight. Great shots, one with a bright meteor. http://pic.twitter.com/78QWenO6f0

— u2622 u1F953 (@arebee) September 28, 2017

NASA's Suomi NPP climate & weather satellite does a great job at seeing #aurora. This overnight image shows it coast to coast over Canada. http://pic.twitter.com/CHsUk5HULG

— NWS Seattle (@NWSSeattle) September 28, 2017

We’re not likely to see another show like this for a while. For one thing, the forecast for space weather isn’t as stormy. The National Weather Service’s Space Weather Prediction Center says the outlook calls for reduced geomagnetic activity, although regions farther north might still see auroras.

The other factor is that the Seattle area will be reverting to a more typical weather pattern overnight. University of Washington atmospheric scientist Cliff Mass explains that a temporary ridge of high pressure is giving way to a low-pressure trough, signaling an end to “the last warm days of the year.”

The National Weather Service’s Seattle office went so far as to call Wednesday night “our final clear night for the foreseeable future.” Now there’s a sobering thought for skywatchers …



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I Almost Lost a Nikon D850 to a Scam on eBay

This is the story of how I recently almost lost a Nikon D850 DSLR to a scam on eBay. Scammers are now targeting higher value eBay sales with fake PayPal phishing emails.

When it comes to buying and selling goods and services on the Internet today, the options are endless. The market that was once dominated by the likes of eBay and Craigslist is now seeing a surge of new options. Facebook now contains a marketplace and groups through which you can buy and sell goods and services with zero selling fees other than the standard PayPal fees on invoiced transactions.

But what has kept eBay afloat despite its hefty selling fees is the auction option and belief that they are a safe platform for both buyers and sellers alike – but are they?

The latest scam to hit eBay had almost fooled even me. I consider myself to be quite savvy when it comes to sniffing out potential scams, as I have done many times in the past.

One week ago I was one of the lucky ones to receive the newly-released and highly sought-after Nikon D850, a camera that has generated a huge number of backorders at B&H Photo and retailers throughout the country. The gradual release of limited units to retailers has created a hype, the likes of which has previously been seen with the release of new iPhone models.

It’s not to the point where people were camping out on the streets in front of retailers, but it did reach a point where the resale value of the few units being resold online has reached as high as $700 to $1,000 above retail. Seeing this (and not urgently needing the camera for myself yet), I decided to try to resell my D850 on eBay with a Buy It Now listing price of $4,200.

Just hours into the listing, the camera was sold at the full asking price. It surprised me that despite the option to submit an offer, this buyer opted to purchase the unit at my extremely high asking price.

A quick look at the buyer’s account revealed what looked like a dormant account. It was a member since 2013 with a feedback score of 4 points, none of which was recent. Being that this was such a high-priced item, I decided to further research the buyer by doing a quick Google search on the buyer’s name and address. I was delighted by the results I received; the name search matched to a family law attorney in Garrettsville, Ohio. What better buyer could I ask for, right?

An invoice request from the buyer was received immediately following the ‘Listing Sold’ notification from eBay, with a note stating the following:

Hi, Please send me more pictures of the item from all angles, send them to my email *********@outlook.com Once i receive it on my email I will submit payment via PayPal Thank You.

The first sign that something isn’t quite right was the reference to my precious Nikon D850 as “the item.” And this was coming from a person that just showed so much respect to my camera by purchasing it way above the MSRP.

As I have come to realize by now, the scammer’s intent with the above note was to get my email address and to show a slight distrust in the purchase. And in an attempt to put me in a defensive mode, he asked me to prove that the item he just purchased is indeed in my possession.

But hours later, before I even had a chance to reply with my photos, I received the below official looking email on my phone from what appeared to be a legit source: service@paypal.com.

Note how the mobile email app completely masks the email address and only displays the email name. In this case, it was named by the scammer as service@paypal.com, but it actually came from the email address shipment-invoice@post.com.

Gmail typically has a phishing alert in place on suspected sites that looks similar to this:

However, Gmail completely missed this one. And while no one may have reported this particular email address for phishing, Gmail should have detected a phishing attempt on an email named service@paypal.com that was not received from the paypal.com domain since it’s such a high target for fraud.

Here are the contents of those emails:

When I pointed on the question mark button next to the address it revealed the following address:

I should point out that handling your buying and selling on a smartphone possibly enables this scam to slip through undetected even to the most trained eyes. The words used in the email and the request to mail it to a different address triggered a warning in my mind. Something didn’t sound right, and when I opened my PayPal app, the funds were nowhere to be found there.

But as you can see in the email, the scammer has taken a step to explain as to why those funds are not showing yet, and someone not familiar with the process can get easily fooled by that explanation.

And It’s ultimately the scammer’s overly-assuring tone that pushed me to Google the buyer’s name again… and this time actually placing a call to the buyer. After a short conversation with the attorney that supposedly purchased the camera, it was clear to us that this was indeed a scam. She never placed an order for a camera and hasn’t been active on eBay for the past few years. She did not know how the scammer got a hold of her account.

The above screenshot shows the verified address on eBay.

And the address requested by the scammer in both the phishing email from PayPal and the personal email below:

Hello,

I have just completed payment, kindly check for notification from PayPal and get back to me with shipment verification today Via FedEx Overnight Shipment Next Day Delivery
Below is the delivery address of my partner whom i am buying the item for as a birthday gift

Tobi Adams
2220 Meridian Blvd Suite #UP639
Minden,Nevada
89423
United States
Regards

Kim
NOTE: It should be posted via FedEx Overnight Shipment Next Day Delivery (8.00 AM Delivery)

So after having my suspicions confirmed, I Googled the above ‘ship to’ address that was provided to me by the scammer. The address is registered to a company known as Shipito (or Eastbiz Corp.) a US package forwarding company (also known as a freight forwarder, a mail forwarder or a shipping forwarder). My search also uncovered a large number of complaints of people who have been scammed by people using Shipito.

A few hours later, I received an email from the scammer. At this point, I decided to play along for entertainment purposes. The following is our correspondence:

Scammer

Hi,
Kindly take note of the correct delivery address, the one i sent before was a mistake.

Below is the delivery address
Philip Ajayi
2220 Meridian Blvd Suite #SX063
Minden,Nevada
89423
United States

Once shipped kindly keep me posted.

Me

It shipped already. Sorry.

Scammer

Hi,
No please call FedEx and redirect it, the address is not correct gave you the correct address please, act at once now very urgent. Would not like anything to happen to the package. Redirect it to the correct address i gave you then you update me with the shipment tracking number.

Me

Oh my. I hope it’s not too late. Who lives in this other apartment?

Scammer

Thats my partners real apartment, made a mistake while sending you the mail was at the middle of something. Its not late just call FedEx they will redirect it for you OK.

Kindly update me once you are done with redirecting the camera to the correct address.

Me

I called. It’s too late. The truck has already picked it up.

Have your partner wait at that apartment at 8AM. The FedEx driver will hand it to him if he shows ID.

Hope it works out.

Scammer

Can I have the tracking number from FedEx?

(End of correspondence.)

This scam appears to consist of hijacking dormant accounts with some feedback, as accounts with no feedback trigger a red flag to sellers. This is followed by sending fake emails “from PayPal” and finally the package is asked to be shipped to a shipping forwarding address, where the scammers take control of the package by either reselling it on eBay or shipping it off overseas.

To avoid being the victim of a scam on eBay, only accept PayPal as payment. After receiving an email from PayPal that the invoice was paid, you should confirm that the funds are indeed showing in your PayPal account. While PayPal may put a hold on the funds it will always show a pending transaction in your account. eBay will warn you if you attempt to ship an item before receiving payment. If such a warning is displayed, do not mail the item until your payment is verified by eBay via PayPal.

I should note that shipping forwarding companies are used in legit sales on eBay, and I have personally mailed to such addresses as long as the address is on file and verified with both eBay and PayPal.

If you receive email correspondence from the buyer, you should always confirm the actual email address that it was mailed from by clicking on the name. Correspondence from PayPal should come from the PayPal.com domain only.

Finally, you should only mail items to the verified address on file with PayPal and eBay in order to qualify for sellers protection. Mailing it to any other address will be at your own risk. This insurance by eBay is partly why you pay the hefty selling fees.

About the author: Eli Wohl is a hobbyist photographer and real estate appraiser in New York City who often shoots street photography in the Jewish Hasidic neighborhood he resides in. He also combines his real estate career and love of photography by shooting architectural, real estate, and interiors for his clients. Eli’s tips have also led to a number of articles on PetaPixel. You can find more of his work on Instagram.



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