Monday, July 31, 2017

ET Obsessions: 'What Would Diplo Do?,' Brooklyn Beckham's Photography Book, 'Detroit,' and 'Manhunt: - 9NEWS.com

This isn't Brooklyn Beckham's first rodeo in the photography realm, having successfully shot a campaign for Burberry last year. Now the 18-year-old celeb son debuts his first photography book, What I See, featuring snapshots of his life, all the while ...

and more »


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The Street Photography of Steve Fanell - Vegas Seven

Gorillaz are coming to Las Vegas for the first time ever. 2016's Grammy winner for best new artist, Chance the Rapper, will return. English rockers Muse will bring their dizzying live show to the streets of Downtown. And that's just the top of an ...



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Finalists for the Comedy Pet Photography Awards - New York Post

Brace yourself for a giggling fit because the finalists of the inaugural Comedy Pet Photography Awards have been revealed. For the first time, the founders of the Comedy Wildlife Photography Awards are giving proud pet owners a chance to show off their ...



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Local pastor using photography to celebrate life - WRDW-TV

NORTH AUGUSTA, S.C. (WRDW/WAGT) -- Andy Hunter has spent over 40 years looking behind a lens -- documenting what and who he's seen around him. It's more than just point and shoot for Hunter. "My tagline is God does the hard work and I just take ...



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Canon 6D Mark II hands-on review shows why you should (not) buy it

Reviews of the new Canon 6D Mark II keep coming in, and the feelings of users still seem mixed. Chris and Jordan from The Camera Store TV made a fantastic hands-on review with the latest Canon’s model. They will give you all the good and the bad sides of this camera, both for photography and […]

The post Canon 6D Mark II hands-on review shows why you should (not) buy it appeared first on DIY Photography.



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This is the first ever photo of a total solar eclipse

Total solar eclipse is coming on August 21, and I guess your cameras and protective filters are ready. But before you start filming or photographing this phenomenon, would you like to see the first ever photo of it? Prussian photographer Johann Julius Friedrich Berkowski was the one who took the first correctly exposed daguerreotype of […]

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I built a pond in my back garden for this fiery wedding portrait

The Hot rod on Fire Shooting inspired me to this one. But there was a huge difference, this photograph was done with only one exposure. We got it done after a lot of preparation – a nearly 3-Meter-long diy fire torch, two strobes and a 4.4 Seconds exposure created this image. Planning did take much longer this […]

The post I built a pond in my back garden for this fiery wedding portrait appeared first on DIY Photography.



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5 Reasons Landscape Photographers Have a Screw Loose

I’m a landscape photographer. And I’m part of a crazy lot. I had this realization during a sleep deprived afternoon. My hazy mind was trying to get me through the rest of the day. It was also trying to comprehend how I arrived at the miserable state I was in. It wasn’t hard to come […]

The post 5 Reasons Landscape Photographers Have a Screw Loose appeared first on DIY Photography.



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5 Reasons Landscape Photographers Have a Screw Loose

I’m a landscape photographer. And I’m part of a crazy lot. I had this realization during a sleep deprived afternoon. My hazy mind was trying to get me through the rest of the day. It was also trying to comprehend how I arrived at the miserable state I was in. It wasn’t hard to come […]

The post 5 Reasons Landscape Photographers Have a Screw Loose appeared first on DIY Photography.



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Are you guilty of these top 10 Photoshop retouching fails?

We were all beginners to Photoshop at some point. It’s a rite of passage with just about anything. You have to be a beginner before you can become skilled. And as beginners we make mistakes. Lots of them. But mistakes are how we learn. This video from photographer Nino Batista highlights his list of the […]

The post Are you guilty of these top 10 Photoshop retouching fails? appeared first on DIY Photography.



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Are you guilty of these top 10 Photoshop retouching fails?

We were all beginners to Photoshop at some point. It’s a rite of passage with just about anything. You have to be a beginner before you can become skilled. And as beginners we make mistakes. Lots of them. But mistakes are how we learn. This video from photographer Nino Batista highlights his list of the […]

The post Are you guilty of these top 10 Photoshop retouching fails? appeared first on DIY Photography.



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That Time I Said ‘F*** No’ to a Hotel’s ‘Advertising Opportunity’

My name is Ryan Horban and I’m a wedding photographer based in Southern California. I shoot 30+ weddings a year, drink IPAs because they are tasty and get me buzzed, have an amazing family that I absolutely love, and won’t be staying at a Sheraton Hotel anytime in the near future unless I’m kidnapped by terrorists and held against my will at a Sheraton property.

So you might be asking yourself right now, “D*mn Ryan, why are you throwing so much shade on Sheraton?” And well, that’s the purpose of this article. So let me start from the beginning of my story.

A couple of weeks back, I’m sitting in my office editing wedding photos and listening to punk rock music when an email jumps into the inbox. Now, nothing makes me feel inner turmoil more than seeing that little red number on my Mail application, so I quickly read it to remove the anxiety building up in my body.

The email is from a woman named Terri who is a director of some sort for Sheraton Hotels. Terri was looking for wedding photos captured at their property they could use for an advertising campaign that would be launching in Exquisite Magazine. Somehow she must have come across a wedding I photographed at the Sheraton and thought, “these are pretty rad photos, I think I will use them!”

So Terri likely got the info of the couple from that blog post, reached out to the bride and asked if Sheraton could use the photos for an advertisement. Unfortunately, the photos my bride got were a little less than 300 dpi, which is a standard number print shops will work with. This is why Terri was contacting me. She wanted me to get her the photos they planned on using for the ad, but at a resolution of 300dpi. She even showed me a mock-up of the ad which you can see below.

Obviously, the first thing any photographer is going to notice when looking at this ad is the lack of a photo credit. Now, this was disturbing for a couple reasons, the first being that it’s 2016 and everyone should know by now you give a photographer credit for their work, especially a large business such as Sheraton!

The other is that I believe the ad would have been run, without a photo credit or notification to me, if Sheraton had access to the images at 300 dpi. It seems I was only being contacted because they needed my help, and I highly doubt they would have reached out if they had the photos at 300 dpi. Here is what Terri stated in her email:

The photos she sent us are not of the dpi we need. Can you help? I have attached the ones we wanted to use but we need at least 300dpi. We will give you photo credit. Please let me know. Thanks terri

My response:

Hey Terri!

I hope you are doing well and life on your side of this email is fantastic! So first of all thanks for reaching out! Your venue was cool and I had a blast working with J***** and C**** last October. That wedding actually got featured in My Hotel Wedding. Also, the ad looks fantastic! I thought it was interesting you used a prism shot of the ceremony. I dig it. I do have a couple quick questions. One is you said you would provide photo credit but on that ad I do not see any credits? Where were those photo credits going to be placed? And YES I can get those images over at 300dpi for printing purposes. No issue there at all.

Terri’s response:

I will ad to the bottom. I didn’t on this as I did not know who did the photography. Thanks. The pictures are beautiful.

Now, this part is interesting because a business really shouldn’t be this far along in the advertising campaign and not know the identity of the photographer behind the content being used (and if Terri didn’t know who the photographer was how did she have my name and contact info?). Yeah, I thought it was weird as well…

Here was my response:

Thanks Terri!

The name works perfect for photo credit “Ryan Horban”. Also, I really do not extend copyrighted images for promotion without compensation even if it is shared copyright. However, the ad looks fantastic and you’ve basically got it completed and ready for print so I would hate to slow that process down in any way. I am of course close with C**** and J**** (the bride+groom) and we both recently had children (boys Reid+ Porter). We could totally use a little stay-cation some time during a weekday. If you could secure us both a promo code for a room at the Sheraton for sometime this year I can get those images at 300DPI sent over today. Normally, my commercial licensing fee is $1500 so it is actually a pretty good deal for Sheraton and it works out well for us. Think it over and let me know.

Terri’s response:

Sorry we will pass on giving you an advertising opportunity.

Maybe it was because I was day drinking, upset about the season finale I DVR’d of Game of Thrones or maybe I was simply having an emotional day. Regardless, I felt like I was totally more than fair to Terri and Sheraton Hotels even in the face of some questionable things at the start. Needless to say, her response pissed me off.

So I figured I had two choices: I could write about my feelings in a journal while shedding tears into a cup of warm cocoa, or I could stand up for myself and every other artist who has tried to be exploited for free labor by a large corporation. So after I cried for hours into my warm cocoa, I closed my journal and I emailed Terri back.

My response:

Terri,

No problem at all. However, you have to understand it’s not a real advertising opportunity for me because the ad promotes Sheraton not the photographer. It’s an advertising opportunity for Sheraton hotels. A bride isn’t going to see that ad and say “I want this wedding photographer”. That’s not how this business works and I think you know that. I can guarantee I wouldn’t book a single bride from that ad. Sheraton on the other hand would book many brides.

I’m actually deeply disappointed that such a large corporation would try to basically take advantage of an artist by not compensating them for their hard work. In fact it’s quite shameful. Is the marketing budget that tight at Sheraton where they can’t compensate artists? Of course not. It’s just that they would rather employ a poor ethical standard and do whatever is necessary to avoid paying an artist for their work. I’m sure you can find someone who will give you their art for free because I mean that is your end goal correct? Sheraton wants beautiful images to promote their wedding venue, book more brides and make more money. I understand that, but you really don’t think it’s fair that the photos that are going to represent your wedding venue and your brand in the best possible light don’t deserve compensation?

I love what I do and give it my absolute everything and I believe that’s the reason why brides book me. I believe this passion is what allows me to create beautiful images, like the photos Sheraton wants to use for their marketing campaign. However, I am a principled man and will stick up for my industry even though we let ourselves get taken advantage of by large businesses every hour of every day. So when a large company such as Sheraton wants to take my art, use it for self-promotion, financial gain and not compensate me, the artist…

The only appropriate response in this situation is: F*CK NO!

Warmly,

Naturally, pushing send on that email felt fantastic and was better than any hotel room or commercial licensing fee I would have received. But the point I am trying to make is this BS happens every single day and it needs to stop. I don’t want to sound like Bernie Sanders here and spend all my time attacking big businesses and corporations, but this practice has been commonplace far too long and it is making it impossible for artists to make a living — especially those trying to start their careers and who might be persuaded by businesses to see these situations as an opportunity rather than what it really is: exploitation.

Thankfully, I have been fortunate enough to provide for my family through art and am established enough to where I can tell Sheraton or any other business trying to take advantage of me or a situation to go f*** themselves. Because I really don’t give a s*** if I ever shoot another wedding at their venue or hotel ever again.

I hate being a person who thinks or acts negatively, so let’s end this on a positive note. We are all worth something. We are all special and have gifts to give. And as artists, we have the right to be treated fairly. Don’t let anyone ever try and take advantage of you or your art. Remember: they need you; you don’t need them. You are special.

I would love to get your feedback on this situation so please feel free to drop a question or comment and I will do my best to respond to them. Oh and here is a photo of me just because.

About the author: Ryan Horban is a wedding photographer based in Southern California. You can find more of his work and writing on his website, blog, and Twitter. This article was also published here.



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Google’s former SVP suggests you should buy an iPhone “if you truly care about great photography”

Vic Gundotra, Google’s former Senior Vice President, recently published quite a passionate praise of the iPhone 7’s camera. He didn’t just call it the killer of DSLR, but also pointed out advantages of the iOS over Android. Not something you’d expect from a former Google’s SVP, right? In a Facebook post, Gundotra published two photos […]

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Google’s former SVP suggests you should buy an iPhone “if you truly care about great photography”

Vic Gundotra, Google’s former Senior Vice President, recently published quite a passionate praise of the iPhone 7’s camera. He didn’t just call it the killer of DSLR, but also pointed out advantages of the iOS over Android. Not something you’d expect from a former Google’s SVP, right? In a Facebook post, Gundotra published two photos […]

The post Google’s former SVP suggests you should buy an iPhone “if you truly care about great photography” appeared first on DIY Photography.



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Ex-Google SVP: iPhone 7 Marks ‘End of DSLR Era,’ Is Years Ahead of Android

The iPhone camera just received praise from a rather unexpected source. Former Google SVP Vic Gundotra had glowing things to say about his iPhone 7’s photo capabilities, claiming that the phone marks “the end of the DSLR era for most people” and that it’s years ahead of Android smartphone cameras.

Gundotra was the Senior Vice President of Social at Google until 2014. While serving in that position, he was closely linked with Google’s photography technologies. In 2012, one of his photos revealed that Snapseed was coming to Android. The following year, he spoke about improving the photo experience on Google+, where 1.5 billion photos were being shared per week.

That’s why it was surprising this past weekend when Gundotra took to Facebook to wax lyrical about his iPhone 7’s camera.

“The end of the DSLR for most people has already arrived,” Gundotra wrote while sharing two Portrait mode photos of his kids at a restaurant. “I left my professional camera at home and took these shots at dinner with my iPhone 7 using computational photography (portrait mode as Apple calls it). Hard not to call these results (in a restaurant, taken on a mobile phone with no flash) stunning. Great job Apple.”

After a commenter responded that the Samsung S8 is even better at photography than the iPhone 7, Gundotra countered by saying that the iPhone’s photo capabilities are years ahead of anything offered by Android phones (in case you didn’t know, Android is developed by Google):

“Here is the problem: It’s Android,” Gundotra writes. “Android is an open source (mostly) operating system that has to be neutral to all parties. This sounds good until you get into the details. Ever wonder why a Samsung phone has a confused and bewildering array of photo options? Should I use the Samsung Camera? Or the Android Camera? Samsung gallery or Google Photos?

“It’s because when Samsung innovates with the underlying hardware (like a better camera) they have to convince Google to allow that innovation to be surfaced to other applications via the appropriate API. That can take YEARS.

“Apple doesn’t have all these constraints. They innovate in the underlying hardware, and just simply update the software with their latest innovations (like portrait mode) and ship it.

“Bottom line: If you truly care about great photography, you own an iPhone. If you don’t mind being a few years behind, buy an Android.”

When Google announced the Pixel Phone in October 2016, a month after Apple announced the iPhone 7, Google boasted that the Pixel contains “best smartphone camera ever.” It seems that at least one former Google senior executive begs to differ.



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This simple technique turns Content Aware Fill into a very powerful tool

Content Aware Fill is one of those features of Photoshop that many users love to hate. So much so that quite a few of us have called it Content Aware Fail since it was first introduced in CS5. Personally, I’ve only found it to be really all that useful for extending clear blue skies, and […]

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This simple technique turns Content Aware Fill into a very powerful tool

Content Aware Fill is one of those features of Photoshop that many users love to hate. So much so that quite a few of us have called it Content Aware Fail since it was first introduced in CS5. Personally, I’ve only found it to be really all that useful for extending clear blue skies, and […]

The post This simple technique turns Content Aware Fill into a very powerful tool appeared first on DIY Photography.



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Countering Stryker’s Punch: Filling the Black Hole with Photoshop and GIMP

The visual record left behind by the United States Farm Security Administration (FSA) photographers has, according to New York Times critic Charles Hagen, come to “represent one of the most ambitious attempts ever made to depict a society in photographs (Hagen, 1985).”

Leading the FSA’s Historical Section was Roy Stryker, a Columbia-trained economist. Though Stryker was not a photographer himself, he understood the power that images could have in economic argument and the general sway of ideas. In fact, New Deal propaganda on the plight and needed social assistance for the rural impoverished was one of the Historical Section’s main aims.

Roy E. Stryker, Head of the Historical Section (Information Division) of the U.S. Farm Security Administration. Photograph by Russell Lee, August 1938

Early during his tenure, Stryker would hire a small but remarkable group of photographers who would go on to express new documentary styles of depicting rural America during the Great Depression. Walker Evans, Dorothea Lange, and Ben Shahn, among other notable artists, all served under Stryker, who in many ways was a pivotal support to them during times of acute economic hardship, and was a strong advocate towards their subsequent post-FSA careers.

As his staff would send back their negatives from the field, it was Stryker who would determine which images would be printed. Those that did not pass his visual inspection he would “kill” by punching a hole in the transparency with a hole punch. To this day, articles continue to lament this past practice, which has certainly affected Stryker’s legacy and the resulting historical visual record.

Untitled photo, possibly related to: Girl in Washington, D.C. slum area. Photograph by John Vachon, December 1937

However, with today’s advanced editing tools it is interesting to ask if these black holes might be revisited and perhaps algorithmically filled in just a few mouse clicks? And if such a workflow was consistently successful, could it be automated across a large quantity of hole-punched images?

Gathering Test Images and Comparing Tools

To begin it was deemed best to start with a clearer sense of the total number of negatives that were killed yet were still archived. Luckily the Library of Congress’ Prints and Photographs Online Catalog (PPOC) hosts the Farm Security Administration/Office of War Information Black-and-White Negatives as a digital collection.

Within this collection, each punched negative has a note in its bibliographic record that states, “Negative has a hole punch made by FSA staff to indicate that the negative should not be printed.” The note entry is an indexed field of the descriptive record, so its contents are searchable. A quick lookup, then, for “hole punch” resulted in 2,472 total images. Examples with either complex detail surrounding the punch or in cases where the hole has completely removed significant image context were excluded from this initial study.

Killed Image with Significant Lost Detail. Untitled photo, possibly related to: Start of the three-legged race. Fair at Albany, Vermont. Photograph by Carl Mydans, September 1936

Content Aware-Fill first became available in Photoshop CS5 in 2010. With new software releases over time, Adobe often makes iterative optimizations to their tools and the algorithms that these features depend upon. The workflow tests that follow were conducted with Photoshop CC 2017.0.1 on an Apple MacBook Pro (OS X 10.11.6, 16GB RAM, 3.1 GHz Intel Core i7 processor, 1TB SSD).

Here is an example of how Content Aware-Fill was used on one of the FSA negatives:

Untitled photo, possibly related to: Arkansas tenant farmer. Photograph by Ben Shahn, October 1935

Using Photoshop’s elliptical marquee tool, a tight selection was made around the hole’s edge.

From Photoshop’s Edit menu > Fill > Content-Aware > OK.

Deselect. Done…

Before and After Photoshop Content-Aware Fill

That the entire process takes four clicks and roughly 10 seconds was a promising revelation. Equally encouraging was the seamlessness of the resulting fill. Here is a 100% detail of the mend from the previous image:

Detail of Content-Aware fill

The following are examples of other images that were similarly filled using Photoshop:

Before and After Photoshop Content-Aware Fill. Untitled. Photograph attributed to Walker Evans Before and After Photoshop Content-Aware Fill. Untitled photo, possibly related to: Sharecropper and sharecropper’s dog. North Carolina. Photograph by John Vachon, April 1938 Before and After Photoshop Content-Aware Fill. Floyd Burroughs, Jr., and Othel Lee Burroughs, called Squeakie. Son of an Alabama cotton sharecropper. Photograph by Walker Evans, Summer 1936 Before and After Photoshop Content-Aware Fill. Untitled photo, possibly related to: Spectators at county fair, central Ohio. Photograph by Ben Shahn, August 1938

It is interesting to note that besides Photoshop’s Content-Aware Fill, GIMP’s Resynthesizer plugin also offers similar functionality within a piece of image editing freeware. Though Photoshop’s tool gets much of the attention for being the Swiss-army knife of quick and effective image filling, Resynthesizer’s code actually pre-dates the release of Content-Aware fill.

GIMP’s latest v.2.8.18 loaded with the Resynthesizer plugin was used to test usability and effectiveness against Content-Aware fill on comparable images. One of the details that immediately became apparent when employing GIMP was how ingeniously designed the built-in fine selection guides were within the software’s ellipse select tool. As a result, very precise selections could be much more easily made than with Photoshop’s elliptical marquee tool:

Fine-tuning GIMP’s Ellipse Select Tool

After selecting the hole, the subsequent workflow steps, though nominally unique to GIMP, were in essence the same as Photoshop’s. In the GIMP, Filters > Enhance > Heal selection were chosen:

Using GIMP’s Heal Selection

This was then followed by a dialog box where the sampling radius around the selection could be tweaked. The radius setting affects the region of texture sampling that is used to inform the Resynthesizer plugin’s algorithm on how best to heal the selection:

Setting Radius Parameter, then Running GIMP Resynthesizer Plugin on Selection

Once initiated, the plugin ran noticeably slower than Photoshop’s Content-Aware fill command. Based upon further sampling from four test images, each run in both programs, the following trend emerged. What required Photoshop on average 10 seconds to accomplish, from selection to fill, GIMP took 34 seconds to finish the same set of operations. And though the resulting visual analyses were subjective, the healed holes in GIMP were consistently more conspicuous and not blended as well as the ones that Photoshop filled. However, the differences between programs in this regard were subtle on average.

Untitled photo, possibly related to: Man with homemade pipe, Washington, D.C. Photograph by John Vachon, April 1937 Detail of Photoshop Content-Aware Fill Result vs. GIMP Resynthesizer Plugin Heal Result Testing Automated Selection and Filling

The last question is whether such image processing could be automated, from selection to final image filling. Photoshop is a flexible piece of software that allows for several different approaches to similar editing issues. However, it is important to remember that one of the guiding principles of this investigation was to find simple strategies that were effective and repeatable.

The biggest challenge in attempting to remove all manual steps from the established Content-Aware Fill workflow was to automate the initial hole selection. For this, Photoshop’s Color Range selection option was tested. Color Range allows for a selection to be drawn around areas within an image that have a particular color. The color can be sampled from within a given image and be set with an eyedropper tool. As the FSA images are all grayscale, the color range setting for the selection tool was pegged at a black level found in one of the image’s holes and was then used thereafter across all the batch processed images. Once the Color Range selection tool settings were tweaked to satisfaction, the tool’s deployment along with the Content-Aware Fill steps were recorded into a Photoshop action, which was then run across a source folder of hole-punched images in an automated batch.

The initial action step then was Select > Color Range. This brought up a dialog box where the following choices were made and the black eyedropper was used to sample from the hole:

Select > Modify > Expand to give the Content-Aware fill tool some additional image data from around the hole to sample from:

Untitled photo, possibly related to: Sharecropper and sharecropper’s dog. North Carolina. Photograph by John Vachon, April 1938

Edit > Fill > Content-Aware

Before and After Color Range Auto Selection and Content-Aware fill Using Photoshop Action

As the example shows, the auto selection process was not exact enough to limit the resulting fill to just the punched hole. Film edge perforations were also selected through the Color Range process and as a result underwent extraneous Content-Aware fill. Though somewhat promising, further automation trials also exposed additional problems with imprecise selection. Beyond edge perforations, other random areas of the image that have similar black values to the punched hole can also be included in the selection. These extraneous areas often gave Content-Aware fill confusing information to work with and led to mixed results.

Before and After Color Range Auto Selection and Content-Aware fill Using Photoshop Action. Untitled photo, possibly related to: Vermont farmer and sheep near North Troy. Photograph by Carl Mydans, August 1936 Summary

As the results of this study indicate, automated image filling currently has limitations of scale when faced with attempting to rebuild highly complex image detail or to fill in the loss of entire objects (e.g. faces). However, when used in conjunction with more manual methods, automation can potentially be employed in a hybrid manner to achieve enhanced post-processing throughput on large image aggregations.

An area of potential future research on the examples in this study includes the use of neighboring negatives. Though all the hole-punched negatives are technically untitled, the Library of Congress, through manual visual analysis, has enhanced the catalog records of these images to include information on other known, titled, and related un-killed images (note the phrase, possibly related to: in the killed images’ title fields). In the case of the 35mm images, the related killed and un-killed images most likely were shot on the same roll of film. A browse by call number link below a given killed negative’s thumbnails brings the user to a screen where related images can be viewed in a grid.

Browse Neighboring Items by Call Number Link.

In the example depicted in Figure 23, the two neighboring images were most likely shot in rapid succession on the same film roll.

Neighboring Items Grid View

Could such un-killed images be used in the future to check the accuracy of related filled images? Could these un-killed images be used in some way as source data by a fill tool to better inform the tool on how to more accurately perform its work?

Finally, it is interesting to step back and consider the nature of the hole-punched FSA negatives from their original creation on mostly 1930s-era 35mm black and white film. If it were not for their recognized visual value, safe transfer to the Library of Congress in 1944 (as requested by Stryker), initial digitization in the 1990s, and subsequent re-digitization between 2010-2014, there would be limited image data to work with today. That such image repurposing as described in this study is even possible is largely based upon a compelling confluence of transcendent photography, collection building foresight, careful digitization decisions and execution, open online access, and clever software algorithms that continue to be refined by intelligent minds.

Yet, what are we to make of these surrogate negatives? Though they are not based upon standard content replication like their hole-punched brethren, the software-filled versions still hold a certain spell and feel of visual symmetry. From an archival standpoint we may even regard them as born-digital objects in their own right. Perhaps in the end they may simply be best considered informed guesses on fragments of displaced history.

As time goes on, and software tools are further enhanced, and perhaps someday the negatives are re-digitized once again to even higher standards, it will be fascinating to re-run similar fill routines on the images to determine if our best visual estimates inch any closer to a truth that we will never be able to fully perceive.

About the author: Michael J. Bennett is Head of Digital Imaging and Conservation at the University of Connecticut. There he oversees the digital capture and conservation operations for the University’s archives and special collections. Previously he has served as project manager of Digital Treasures, a digital repository of the cultural history of Central and Western Massachusetts and as executive committee member for Massachusetts’ Digital Commonwealth portal. You can find more of his work at Tundra Graphics. This article was also published here.



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Former Google Executive Vic Gundotra: 'If You Truly Care About Great Photography, You Own an iPhone' - Mac Rumors

Gundotra's original post received a comment that said Samsung's Galaxy S8 was a better photography tool than the iPhone 7, to which he commented with a detailed response explaining why he believes that's not the case. Specifically, the former Google ...
Former Google SVP says Android phones 'years' behind the iPhone in photography 9to5Mac
Don't buy Android if you care about mobile photography, says former Google SVP BetaNews
Former Google exec Vic Gundotra praises Apple iPhone 7 Plus camera, says Android photography years behind AppleInsider (press release) (blog)
India Today  -TNW  -Business Insider UK
all 15 news articles »


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Former Google SVP prefers iPhone over Android for mobile photography

Vic Gundotra was an SVP of engineering at Google for almost eight years before leaving the company in 2014 and heavily involved in running Google's mobile initiatives. However, despite being one of the main drivers behind Android from 2007 to 2010 Gundotra appears to prefer Apple's iPhones over Android devices, at least for photography.

In a Facebook post, Gundotra called the results of the background-blurring iPhone 7 Plus portrait mode "stunning" and "the end of the DSLR for most people". When replying to comments on the post he went on the say that, in terms of imaging, Android phones were years behind the iPhone:

"Here is the problem: It's Android. Android is an open source (mostly) operating system that has to be neutral to all parties. This sounds good until you get into the details. Ever wonder why a Samsung phone has a confused and bewildering array of photo options? Should I use the Samsung Camera? Or the Android Camera? Samsung gallery or Google Photos?

It's because when Samsung innovates with the underlying hardware (like a better camera) they have to convince Google to allow that innovation to be surfaced to other applications via the appropriate API. That can take YEARS.

Also the greatest innovation isn't even happening at the hardware level - it's happening at the computational photography level. (Google was crushing this 5 years ago - they had had "auto awesome" that used AI techniques to automatically remove wrinkles, whiten teeth, add vignetting, etc... but recently Google has fallen back).

Apple doesn't have all these constraints. They innovate in the underlying hardware, and just simply update the software with their latest innovations (like portrait mode) and ship it.

Bottom line: If you truly care about great photography, you own an iPhone. If you don't mind being a few years behind, buy an Android."

Apple's portrait mode doesn't come without its limitations but it's probably fair to say among all the various incarnations of depth or bokeh effects we have seen so far it is the best performing. On the other hand some Android smartphones, such as the Google Pixel or HTC U11, offer an advantage over the latest iPhone models in terms of detail resolution and textures.

So, like with so many things, the smartphone camera that is best for you depends a lot on your personal requirements. Vic Gundotra definitely seems to have made his mind up, though. In another post he says he "would NEVER buy an Android phone again if I cared about photography." Do you agree? Let us know in the comments.



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How to photograph watches with only a kit lens and a speedlight

Shiny male watch on a black background will certainly catch your eye in a catalog or in an Instagram feed. You can also create this kind of look, and you don’t even need an expensive studio gear to do it. Photographer Dustin Dolby shares his workflow that will give you the stylish, catalog-worthy photo of […]

The post How to photograph watches with only a kit lens and a speedlight appeared first on DIY Photography.



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Springs, levers and electromagnets are what makes a DSLR shutter mechanism work

We’ve posted about what shutter speed is, from a photographic standpoint, and shown the basics of how shutters works before. But this video from photographer Chris Marquardt takes things just that bit further. He literally pulls a shutter mechanism out of a Nikon D500 to show us the nitty gritty. We all know the basic principles […]

The post Springs, levers and electromagnets are what makes a DSLR shutter mechanism work appeared first on DIY Photography.



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Comedy Pet Photography Awards 2017, in pictures - Telegraph.co.uk

Brace yourself for a giggling fit because the finalists of the inaugural Comedy Pet Photography Awards have been revealed. For the first time, the founders of the Comedy Wildlife Photography Awards have launched a photography award show giving proud ...



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Kenny Stills works on photography skills during El Clasico - Palm Beach Post

Miami Dolphins wide receiver Kenny Stills (10) at Baptist Health Training Facility at Nova Southeastern University in Davie, Florida on July 27, 2017. (Allen Eyestone / The Palm Beach Post). Unlike some of his Dolphins teammates who decided to be fans ...



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Former Google SVP says Android phones 'years' behind the iPhone in photography - 9to5Mac

Former Google senior vice president of Social, Vic Gundotra, has said that Android phones are literally years behind the iPhone when it comes to photography – and it's Android's fault. Gundotra started by praising the quality of the iPhone 7 Plus ...
One of Google's former senior execs said 'if you truly care about great photography, you own an iPhone' Business Insider UK
Vic Gundotra, former Google SVP, praises the iPhone camera SlashGear

all 10 news articles »


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Ex-Google VP: Android is the reason your phone takes worse pics than iPhone


Jealous that your flashy new smartphone still struggles to capture photos as stunning as the iPhone? Android might be to blame… or so says a former Google executive who once headed the company’s overall mobile efforts. This weekend Vic Gundotra, who is widely considered to be the man behind Google Plus, took to Facebook to ponder over the nascent demise of DSLR photography and the hulking cameras that come along with it. Sharing two gorgeous images of his children that he snapped over dinner with his iPhone 7 Plus, the ex-Googler took a moment to laud Apple for its excellent…

This story continues at The Next Web

Or just read more coverage about: Android,iPhone,Google

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Deal Alert: Switch to Spyder5ELITE+ for $139 today!

If you’ve done any sort of serious client work you know that a calibrated monitor is a must. If you’ve been using an old calibration tool, this is your chance to upgrade to a new state of the art calibration tool. Datacolor is offering an upgrade program where they upgrade your kit from any existing […]

The post Deal Alert: Switch to Spyder5ELITE+ for $139 today! appeared first on DIY Photography.



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Deal Alert: Switch to Spyder5ELITE+ for $139 today!

If you’ve done any sort of serious client work you know that a calibrated monitor is a must. If you’ve been using an old calibration tool, this is your chance to upgrade to a new state of the art calibration tool. Datacolor is offering an upgrade program where they upgrade your kit from any existing […]

The post Deal Alert: Switch to Spyder5ELITE+ for $139 today! appeared first on DIY Photography.



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This is how to shoot a $2,500,000 car with a $50,000 camera

There’s only a hundred Pagani Huayra BC in the world, and each one costs a cool $2.5mil. The “BC” in its designation stands for Benny Caiola, the first person to ever buy a Pagani automobile. With a Mercedes AMG designed V12 bi-turbo engine built exclusively for Pagani and pulling more than 750bhp, it’s a beast […]

The post This is how to shoot a $2,500,000 car with a $50,000 camera appeared first on DIY Photography.



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This is how to shoot a $2,500,000 car with a $50,000 camera

There’s only a hundred Pagani Huayra BC in the world, and each one costs a cool $2.5mil. The “BC” in its designation stands for Benny Caiola, the first person to ever buy a Pagani automobile. With a Mercedes AMG designed V12 bi-turbo engine built exclusively for Pagani and pulling more than 750bhp, it’s a beast […]

The post This is how to shoot a $2,500,000 car with a $50,000 camera appeared first on DIY Photography.



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LG V30 could be awesome for low-light photography - Phone Arena

Smartphone cameras may have come a long way, but one of their greatest shortcomings is yet to be adequately addressed – their poor low-light performance. Since smartphone cameras are powered by tiny sensors (at least compared to dedicated cameras), ...

and more »


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DPReview on TWiT: How to take macro photographs

DPReview has partnered with the TWiT Network (named after its flagship show, This Week in Tech) to produce a regular segment for The New Screen Savers, a popular weekend show hosted by technology guru Leo Laporte.

On this week's episode of The New Screen Savers, the hosts discussed emojis, action cameras and Macro photography. DPReview editor Barney Britton spoke to Leo Laporte and Jason Snell about how to get great closeup pictures, without breaking the bank. We'd recommend watching the whole episode, but if you're especially interested in macro photography tips (or if you're Barney's mum) jump to 43:00 for the beginning of our segment.

You can watch The New Screen Savers live every Saturday at 3pm Pacific Time (23:00 UTC), on demand through our articles, the TWiT website, or YouTube, as well as through most podcasting apps.



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The 5 Must-See David Lynch Movies If You Like ‘Twin Peaks’

Director David Lynch.Cristiano Siqueira

The “Twin Peaks” reboot on Showtime has brought a whole new audience of viewers into the world of David Lynch. Whether you are new to the work of Lynch, or a long time fan since the beginning, here’s a rundown of some of the other must-see works of David Lynch.

David Lynch is one of the greatest American directors. He’s actually a Jack-of-all-trades or even a Renaissance Man who lends his creative talents to directing, screenwriting, painting, acting, painting, photography, and even making music. No matter your taste preference for his work, it cannot be denied that his artistry has left an indelible mark on modern American cinema (and the small screen as well).

Lynch’s “Twin Peaks: the Return” (created in conjunction with Mark Frost) has introduced his work to a new generation as well as reinvigorated those already familiar with his work. We take a look at some of Lynch’s best films, so you know what to watch next.

5 Must See David Lynch Films 1. “Blue Velvet” (1986)

This film is one part noir, one part horror, and if you appreciate the creeper aspects of “Twin Peaks,” then this one might be right up your alley. Kyle Maclachlan makes his debut in this film–and not as Agent Dale Cooper (or alternative Agent Cooper), but as a young man who becomes infatuated with a beautiful lounge singer (played by Isabella Rossellini) and gets mixed up in some very bad business at the hands of a creepy gangster played by Dennis Hopper.

2. “Mulholland Drive” (2001)

Naomi Watts, another regular Lynch collaborator, makes her Lynchian debut in what may be Lynch’s most critically-acclaimed film. Mulholland is another neo-noir film with a mystery of sorts at its center that involves Watts and a mysterious woman who survives a car crash on Mulholland Drive. The narrative isn’t linear so it can be quite disconcerting, but in a good way.

3. “Dune” (1984)

While not a success at the box office, or with the critics at the time, Lynch’s take on the Frank Herbert sci-fi novel by the same name, “Dune” is still worth seeing. The film features Lynch mainstay Kyle Maclachlan as well as ex-Police frontman, Sting. The special effects are certainly dated and somewhat cheesy when looking back at the film today, but it’s a thrilling story and seeing Kyle Maclachlan riding a giant sand worm is something to behold.

4. “Wild at Heart” (1990)

“Wild at Heart”, which came out after just after the original “Twin Peaks” series ended can boast about having maybe the most actors from Twin Peaks as part of its cast. Laura Dern, Harry Dean Stanton, Sherilyn Fenn, Sheryl Lee are all “Twin Peaks” actors (including the original and the return) and act alongside Nicholas Cage, Isabella Rossellini, and others. The story is of young love on the run and while the reviews were a mixed bag of both good and bad, it’s worth a trip back to 1990.

5. “Eraserhead” (1977)

The one that started it all was “Eraserhead”–Lynch’s first feature film. And from the Lynchian cannon it is probably the most surreal–even considering some of the strong surrealism from the series “Twin Peaks: the Return.” The film stars a much younger Jack Nance and Charlotte Stewart, who respectively played Pete Martell and Betty Briggs (the wife of Major Briggs) in the original “Twin Peaks.” Shot in black and white, it’s a surreal horror film that plays with themes of darkness, industrial bleakness, and generally leaves one with a disturbing feeling. While it’s not the easiest film to watch, it’s important  in the pursuit of understanding the creative world of David Lynch.

Related on EcoSalon

OMG – ‘Twin Peaks’ is Coming Back in 2016
David Lynch’s Pregnancy Test Commercial is More Like Birth Control [Video]
Great… Now I’m Craving Coffee [Video]

The post The 5 Must-See David Lynch Movies If You Like ‘Twin Peaks’ appeared first on EcoSalon.



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Sunday, July 30, 2017

Helmut Newton's Photography Inspired The Atomic Blonde Costumes - Refinery29

Charlize Theron's Atomic Blonde character Lorraine Broughton kicks ass and takes names in the action thriller. And as it happens, the most elite spy in MI6 has a seriously enviable wardrobe. Costume designer Cindy Evans says the photography of Helmut ...



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Professional photography tips and incredible collections - Komando

Time magazine is one of the longest-running magazines in history. Some of the best photographers in the world work for this 94-year-old publication. If you're interested in learning more about photography then you have to take a look at LightBox ...



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Smart phone photography tips for the Solar Eclipse - Island Packet

Don't chimp, just shoot - Chimping is the term that professional photographers use to describe people who immediately look at the photo on the back of their camera after shooting it. Make sure you have enough room cleared on your phone and that it is ...
The best solar eclipse photography gear out there Komando
Eclipse: Who? What? Where? When? and How? | Total Solar Eclipse 2017 NASA Eclipse 2017

all 135 news articles »


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Photographer finds film in 1929 Zeiss Ikon camera, here are the developed photos

When photography enthusiast Martijn van Oers stumbled upon an original 1929 Zeiss Ikon 520/2 medium-format camera at a second-hand store, he didn't expect to find an old roll of used film inside. The film, marked only with the word 'EXPOSÉ,' was made between the 1940s and 1970s, and the roll didn't provide any clues about what lay hidden inside.

As Oers explains in a recent post on Bored Panda, the roll of film was successfully developed with the help of his friend Johan Holleman. Only four of the resulting photos contained enough detail to discern anything about the film's history, but it was proven enough. Operating on a tip from a contact, Oers compared the photos to Google Street View imagery and determined that they were likely taken in the French city Biarritz.

Oers shared scans of the photos with the public; two elderly individuals, one man and one woman, are visible in them, though both people remain unidentified.

He also shared photos of the folding camera itself, and the process by which the shots were developed:

We spoke to Oers briefly, and he seemed thrilled by his find and all of the attention the photos were getting. And while you might think he plans to put the camera on a shelf as a memento, that's not actually the case. He tells us that, while he normally prefers to shoot Nikon, he plans to start using the 1929 Zeiss Ikon camera as well.

Check out the final images and behind the scenes shots in the galleries above, and then head over to Instagram to see more of Oers work.

All photos courtesy of Martijn van Oers and used with permission.



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Underwater 360 Photography: Nikon Vs Garmin, Tips And More - Forbes

As cool as 360 photos are normally, it had seemed to me that underwater was an even better place to take photos and videos. With the Garmin VIRB 360 and Nikon KeyMission 360 in hand (ok, hands), I set out to explore the briny deep. And by deep I mean ...

and more »


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Dare leads to photography career for Cumberland Gap native - The Middlesboro Daily News

Joe Clark was born in Cumberland Gap in 1904 and lived there until the Great Depression years when he moved to Detroit to look for a job. In 1934, he went to work as a night watchman at Hudson's Department Store, a position that would strangely enough ...

and more »


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Point and shoot: Kids take family photography up a notch - WECT-TV6

She is a professional photographer who shares photo-taking tips in seminars, books and a television series. “We really made that show for moms, but kids got so into watching it and now no matter where I go, I have 3 and 4-year-olds come up to me who ...



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Underwater 360 Photography: Nikon Vs Garmin, Tips And More

The Garmin and Nikon 360 cameras are waterproof. How well do they work underwater? How well does 360 photography work underwater in general? Well…

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Ep. 198: Richard Is No Prince – and more

Episode 198 of the PetaPixel Photography Podcast.
Download MP3 –  Subscribe via iTunesGoogle Play,  or RSS!

Featured: Sony Artisan and The Giving Lens founder Colby Brown

In This Episode

If you subscribe to the PetaPixel Photography Podcast in iTunes, please take a moment to rate and review us and help us move up in the rankings so others interested in photography may find us.

Show Opener:
Sony Artisan and The Giving Lens founder Colby Brown opens the show. Thanks Colby!

Sponsors:
– Get 10% off your order at MeFOTO.comTenba.comKupoGrip.com and StellaProLights.com using code PetaPixel.
– First time customers in the US get $25 off rentals of $50 or more through September 29, 2017 with code PP25 at BorrowLenses.com.

Stories:
The copyright infringement lawsuit against “photographer” Richard Prince goes forward. (#)

Copytrack with surprising data on worldwide copyright infringement. (#)

New TSA regulations you need to know about if you’re flying with your gear. (#)

A Kickstarter campaign for an old portrait lens to be available in various mounts if successful. (#)

US Capitol Police demand that journalists stop shooting and delete photos and videos during a protest. (#)

GoPro finally releases functionality to help users deal with their video footage. (#)

Outtake

Connect With Us

Thank you for listening to the PetaPixel Photography Podcast! Connect with me, Sharky James on TwitterInstagram and Facebook (all @LensShark) as we build this community.

We’d love to answer your question on the show. Leave us an audio question through our voicemail widget, comment below or via social media. But audio questions are awesome!

You can also cut a show opener for us to play on the show! As an example: “Hi, this is Matt Smith with Double Heart Photography in Chicago, Illinois, and you’re listening to the PetaPixel Photography Podcast with Sharky James!”



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How does the GH5 compare to a GoPro for timelapse

Here is an interesting question. If a $50 Handycam can be compared to $50,000 RED, why not pitch a Panasonic GH5 against a GoPro? Youtuber biscuitsalive did just that and has some interesting feedback on the resulting footage. While the GoPro will probably work in a pinch, biscuits lists three main areas where the GoPro can improve. I agree […]

The post How does the GH5 compare to a GoPro for timelapse appeared first on DIY Photography.



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How does the GH5 compare to a GoPro for timelapse

Here is an interesting question. If a $50 Handycam can be compared to $50,000 RED, why not pitch a Panasonic GH5 against a GoPro? Youtuber biscuitsalive did just that and has some interesting feedback on the resulting footage. While the GoPro will probably work in a pinch, biscuits lists three main areas where the GoPro can improve. I agree […]

The post How does the GH5 compare to a GoPro for timelapse appeared first on DIY Photography.



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Dare leads to photography career for Cumberland Gap native - The Harlan Daily Enterprise

Joe Clark was born in Cumberland Gap in 1904 and lived there until the Great Depression years when he moved to Detroit to look for a job. In 1934, he went to work as a night watchman at Hudson's Department Store, a position that would strangely enough ...



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This short movie shows the difference between diffused, double diffused and hard light

Most large modifiers come with two diffusers. A big one for the outer rim and a smaller one that fits between the source of light and the big diffuser, right in the middle of the modifier. Of course, this begs the question how may diffusion layers do you actually need. Photographer Francisco Joel Hernandez shares a short, […]

The post This short movie shows the difference between diffused, double diffused and hard light appeared first on DIY Photography.



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This short movie shows the difference between diffused, double diffused and hard light

Most large modifiers come with two diffusers. A big one for the outer rim and a smaller one that fits between the source of light and the big diffuser, right in the middle of the modifier. Of course, this begs the question how may diffusion layers do you actually need. Photographer Francisco Joel Hernandez shares a short, […]

The post This short movie shows the difference between diffused, double diffused and hard light appeared first on DIY Photography.



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How Diffusion Panels Affect the Light in Your Strobe Photography - Fstoppers

Most lighting modifiers come with diffusion panels that soften and even out the light emitted. Some even come with two panels. These panels can have a strong effect on your light, and it's well worth understanding exactly what to expect when you use ...



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Saturday, July 29, 2017

How My Photography and Video Portfolio Website Evolved Through the Years and What I've Learned - Fstoppers

You may have just started your journey in photography or you have been on the market for quite some time, and you still wonder if your website has more to do with getting more clients than you might think. The answer is yes, but only to some extent ...



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A Trip to the Woods: Wildlife and Bird Photography With the Sony a9 Mirrorless Camera - Fstoppers

Since the new Sony a9 announcement and subsequent release, it's been earmarked as an honest competitor to the sports and wildlife scene. As time went on we saw a lot of talk about it being framed in the context of sports photography, so I eagerly ...



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