Friday, March 31, 2017

Travel Photography with a 35mm: How a Prime Lens Stole My Heart

From the beginning of my photography career—which is … almost 30 years ago (that can’t be true!)—I’ve been shooting with zoom lenses. Due to the flexibility they offer, I was convinced they make the best choice; as far as I know, thousands of other travel photographers who would say the same.

I personally started with the classic 18-200mm zoom lens, sometimes referred to as “the travel zoom.” But after some time, I moved to a heavier solution, the 24-70mm f/2.8 and the 70-200mm f/2.8, because I wanted faster glass and the option to compose with a thinner depth of field. Then, at some point, I started to travel with 2 bodies (currently Nikon D4s and Nikon D500 or D3s as second body).

By now I’ve traveled to roughly 50 countries in 5 continents and shot literally tens of thousands of photos with these lenses. Sometimes I would add a wide-angle zoom lens or some other prime to my bag, mainly for portrait shooting, but still, there was never a doubt that the 24-70mm and the 70-200m would remain my main lenses.

In 2012, I was leading a photo tour in Bhutan and one of the participating photographers had really bad luck: right in the beginning of the trip he dropped and destroyed his own 24-70mm. We were all full of sympathy for him, imagining what it would be like to travel all the way to Bhutan (in the Himalayas) and destroy our most important lens before we had even shot anything!

Fortunately, he had an additional 35mm prime lens in his bag, which he then used during the entire trip.

Some days later he told me that he was able to develop a different attitude thanks to this experience; that he would see his bad luck now as a great opportunity. He said because he had lost the ability to zoom, he would have to change his approach towards subject and scenery. Because of this, he said, he had captured very different pictures and was actually was developing a totally new style.

When he showed me his pictures, I was stunned.

Since then, I’ve thought about this man’s experience quite often. Back then, I had only one prime lens in my bag (an 85mm f/1.4 that I used for portraits), but I started to equip myself with more primes. Still, I was too anxious to miss a good shot, so the zoom lenses remained my go-tos.

Then last year, I added a 35mm f/1.4 to my bag.

After playing with it a little in Germany, I almost forgot that I had it. When I packed my bags for another photo trip which I would lead in Kerala, south India in January 2017, I held it in my hands again and pondered whether I should carry the lens for the trip. Eventually, I decided to give it a try.

This turned out to be a meaningful decision for me.

In the beginning of the trip, I started using my zoom lenses as usual. But then on the second morning in Cochin we went out with a boat to shoot the sunrise and the legendary Chinese fishnets. On the way, we saw some nomadic fishermen in very small boats who started their business before sunrise.

Everybody was stunned by the beauty of the scenery and started shooting. As there was still very little light available, we used our widest apertures—which for the zoom lenses was f/2.8. But since our boat was also moving, we had to maintain a relatively high shutter speed resulting in very high ISO.

That’s when I remembered my 35mm f/1.4 and quickly changed lenses. I used it at f/1.4 and a shutter of just 1/125; still I needed ISO 6400 to get enough light. Later, it turned out that I was the only one among the group who was able to capture a decent shot of the scene!

Of course, we also later shot the ancient Chinese fishnets which we came for, and here again I was using the 35mm lens.

From that day on I started to use the 35mm frequently, becoming more and more confident with actually using the 35 as my main lens. When we went out shooting a market in Cochin, I realized that the 35mm would also work well for portraits.

By the next occasion, I was using ONLY the 35mm. It was a laundry and I forced myself to keep the 35mm lens on the camera. As my fellow photographer in Bhutan suggested, I started to “zoom with my feet.” I realized that using a zoom lens for so many years had, in a way, made me lazy. I was now getting agile again, moving around a lot more.

On our way to the north of Kerala, we stopped in a primary school where we were allowed to take some pictures. Here I was happy to see the shallow depth of field for my composition to isolate the two girls in the foreground. We also stopped at a Christian church (which you will find quite a lot due to Kerala’s past as a Portuguese Colony) and I was able to convince the priest for portrait in his Church.

On another occasion, we stopped at a shadow puppet theater and I was allowed to shoot behind the scenes. Again I was very happy with my choice of the 35mm as there was relatively little light and the puppet players were moving much faster than you would have expected. So I shot with f/2.2 at 1/200 and ISO 2500, and was able to capture the atmosphere of the scene.

The next day we went to a martial arts school where kids learned the tradition of Kalarippayat. That is a century-old martial art form specifically found in Kerala.

Before the start of a training or fight, it is part of the ritual to do a small prayer, which I captured with one of the smallest boys in the school. Again I was using the 35mm, this time with f/1.4 at 1/80 and ISO 2000. A little later the actual training started, and I captured one girl in full-flight attacking her master—of course, with the 35mm at f/2.2 and 1/250, ISO 3200 and a fill-in flash.

Eventually, we arrived at our major destination in the north of Kerala where we were supposed to photograph the Theyyam festival.

During this festival a human person personifies a God. By certain rituals which include particular dressing, masking and getting into a trance they actually become this Hindu God for a small period of time. And because these protagonists are Gods for a specific time, they can do incredible things such as running through big fires without getting hurt. It’s an otherworldly scene.

After their performance, the believers will also tell them their wishes, thank them for being gracious in the past, and/or seek advice in the matters of their lives. In one photo you can see the kids screaming at one of the Gods. I shot it with the 35mm at f/1.8 and 1/400 at ISO 100.

Some of these performances happened at night, so it was particularly difficult to capture the Hindu God and I was very happy I had my 35mm. First, I managed to get some good shots of him playing with the fire with f/1.4 and 1/320 at ISO 2200, and later when he was running through the fire with f/2.5 and 1/320 at ISO 100.

In the morning, some of the ritual drummers got very sleepy as they had played all night long, so I took a shot of them with f/1.8 at 1/100 and ISO 800. The friendly people of Kerala also invited us to join their lunch and I was impressed of the open air kitchen and the chefs doing their work for the crowds.

Again, I captured it with my 35mm. The vertical shot is with f/3.2 at 1/100 and ISO 3200 and the horizontal shot with f/2.8 at 1/200 and ISO 3200.

During the trip I really started to appreciate the incredible speed that was possible with this prime lens, and the particular feel, quality and sharpness of the pictures. I would have never thought this before, but while I was still on the road, I realized that the 35mm literally became my preferred lens.

I would start every morning with it, and even if I sometimes had changed lenses again over the day, I usually ended my day with the 35mm as well. After the trip I checked on the meta data in Lightroom and found the proof: the majority of my best pictures were shot with the 35mm.

Now it is certain that this lens will stay in my bag. We’ll have to wait and see … but maybe one day I will even be brave enough to leave my zooms lenses at home.

About the author: Thorge Berger is a talented travel photographer and personal development trainer, coach and consultant. To see more of his work, visit his website. This post was also published here.



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Photographer wanted to capture Moon, but then he focused and saw his mistake

How many times have you thought of an object to be something else? This happened to Fox 5 DC journalist Van Applegate and caused one of his images to go viral. Thanks to a mistake he made while taking the photo, the very same photo went viral and put a smile on faces of many. […]

The post Photographer wanted to capture Moon, but then he focused and saw his mistake appeared first on DIY Photography.



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Photographer wanted to capture Moon, but then he focused and saw his mistake

How many times have you thought of an object to be something else? This happened to Fox 5 DC journalist Van Applegate and caused one of his images to go viral. Thanks to a mistake he made while taking the photo, the very same photo went viral and put a smile on faces of many. […]

The post Photographer wanted to capture Moon, but then he focused and saw his mistake appeared first on DIY Photography.



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Why the Technical Stuff Matters

Along with normal how-to articles and essays, I’ve always liked reading and writing very technical, nitty-gritty articles about photography—sometimes, articles on topics that rarely come up while actually taking pictures.

In fact, I usually don’t even use my own sharpest aperture charts in the field, as useful as they are, since I don’t like carrying around charts. So, then, does all that technical stuff matter? Is it even worth talking about in the first place?

These questions are very important to ask, since most people don’t want waste their time on topics that are unnecessary for their photography—do these articles actually help? There are no easy answers, but a recent trip I took to Death Valley makes a compelling argument for why some of this highly-technical information really does matter.

1. Driving a Car/Using a Camera

If you’ve just passed your driver’s test, and you’ve barely been behind the wheel for a few hours, the scariest thing in the world would be to see someone swerving in front of your car on the highway.

At that point, you have enough driving experience to nail down the basics: using turn signals, staying in your own lane, watching your speed, and so on. From the outside, you certainly look like a competent driver—and, in many ways, you are, since you just passed your test.

Yet, when you just start to drive, it naturally takes a lot of conscious thought to do everything correctly. You’re always glancing at your speedometer, for example, or you’re constantly thinking about staying within your lane. Nothing is habitual or automatic; your brain is hard at work the entire time.

So, when another car does something unexpected, you may not know how to solve the problem instantly. Your automatic reaction system isn’t developed yet, and your brain is still focused on the basics. It’s not that you’re a bad driver—in fact, even when you’re starting out, you probably knew enough to drive flawlessly under typical conditions—but you haven’t internalized everything yet.

That’s how I see the technical side of photography.

Many of us have a solid understanding of camera technique: aperture, shutter speed, focusing, and other technical skills that are part of your basic, creative toolkit. It’s not that you simply know them at a surface level, either; you actually understand them. You could even teach other photographers how many of these concepts work, and you’ve taken plenty of good photos that put your knowledge into practice.

But that isn’t always enough. Sometimes, you’ll be taking pictures under rapidly-changing conditions, and you don’t have time to think about exposure or depth of field—you don’t have time to think about anything. Every step of the process needs to be perfectly ingrained in your head, or you’ll miss the shot.

Simply learning a lot of technical information is not the same as knowing everything backwards and forwards in your sleep. When conditions are changing rapidly, a few seconds can be crucial. How do you maximize your time and truly understand the basics, so that you spend as little time as possible perfecting the basic technical stuff—aperture, exposure, focusing, and so on?

One way is practice. When you start out in photography, the best method to master the basics is to keep taking pictures and reading about the topics you’re trying to master. That’s how most people do it, and it obviously works well.

However, the problem with practice is that some concepts pop up so rarely that it may take months or years before they’re fully ingrained in your head. In other cases—say, setting an aperture that balances diffraction with depth of field—you may have plenty of time to do trial-and-error in the field (assuming typical conditions) without really understanding the topic. It’s only when you’re rushed that you realize your reactions aren’t as quick as they could be.

That brings us to the other method: Learning the really technical stuff.

When you read about high-level, complex photographic topics, or you start to work with them in the field, you’ll force yourself to learn the basics solidly. If you can understand highly-technical information—even at a surface level—it means that you have a rock-solid foundation. For example, by reading about a topic like Airy disks, even if you don’t think about it while you’re out in the field, you’re forcing your brain to understand basic concepts like aperture and diffraction with far more thoroughness.

And that’s the goal.

When you read about crazy topics, the benefit isn’t just to teach something new. Often, it’s to reinforce the old, basic skills in such a way that they become automatic parts of your thought process. Say the words “large aperture” to a professional photographer, and they’ll instantly think of countless things—bokeh, focus mode, depth of field, the necessary shutter speed and ISO values, and countless more—while a beginner is still working to remember that a large aperture is a small number.

It’s one thing to understand how a basic, important topic works if you have a few moments to sit back and think about it, but it’s totally different to recall it automatically while you’re being pelted by sand and 35mph winds, trying to take a photo before the light changes.

2. A Case Study

That brings us back to what I mentioned at the start of this article: Death Valley.

This was only my second trip to the area, so I’m not yet at the point of knowing exactly what to photograph in Death Valley, but I was familiar with the Mesquite Sand Dunes. I also knew that, on a day with 35mph gusts of wind, the sand dunes would be a vicious place to take pictures.

But you know the saying—“Bad weather makes good photos!”—and I know it, too. So, with sunglasses and a scarf to block the sand, I treaded into the desert for sunset photography.

Everything was fine for an hour or so, and the light was starting to get good. The clouds were dark and dramatic, and the sand in the air was creating amazing lighting conditions. After hiking an hour into the dunes, not long before sunset, I noticed a low-hanging cloud in the distance.

As I took more and more photos, it became clear that this cloud was quickly approaching the dunes—and it wasn’t a normal cloud. Out in the middle of the desert, while I took pictures of a spectacular sunset, a massive cloud of sand was rolling in my direction.

As you can imagine, I was rushing to capture the best possible photos before the sand cloud arrived, and I didn’t have much time. To be as efficient as possible, I ended up taking just a couple photos per tripod position, then walking a bit farther and finding something else to capture. This isn’t my normal method, but these were unusual circumstances.

Side note: I strongly caution people against going into the desert, or any other landscape like this, unprepared. Mother Nature is harsh. It’s best if you can bring someone else along, as I did, but that’s not enough. I also had a walkie talkie, a GPS, a separate GPS on my phone, a full battery pack to charge my phone, and even some spotty cell coverage. I also had a bright flashlight and plenty of water, and it wasn’t a hot night in the first place.

Even then—knowing that I was well-prepared, and knowing exactly where my car was—parts of that sandstorm were otherworldly. I very likely could have maneuvered back to my car or the road without a GPS… but I certainly wouldn’t have wanted to try.

That said, if you stay safe, crazy weather almost always pays off.

I came back with a handful of photos that I really liked, including the one below:

NIKON D800E + 35mm f/1.8 @ 35mm, ISO 100, 1.3 seconds, f/16.0

I only took a single photo from this tripod position. In fact, it was the last shot I captured before the cloud of sand was overhead, and visibility dropped to about ten meters in each direction. (If you look at the left-hand side of the photo, you can actually see the very front edge of the dust cloud approaching.)

To make this single photo a success, several things needed to go right. First, since my focal length was 35mm, and the foreground was quite close to the lens, a small aperture was crucial (and I chose f/16). My focusing distance had to be roughly at the hyperfocal distance, or I risked a blurry background or foreground. Also, dealing with a high-contrast sky, I needed to watch the exposure and make sure not to lose any highlight detail. An error in any one of these steps—or a few extra seconds spent, since the dust cloud was approaching rapidly—would harm the photo significantly, and perhaps beyond repair.

In a situation like this, 100% of your mental energy should be focused on finding the best possible subject and composition. All the technical settings should fly through the back of your mind without wasting time, yet they also need to be as accurate as possible.

In this case, it went well. I credit part of that success to luck (since shots like this certainly don’t always work out), part to practice, and part to reading and writing articles that are vastly more complex than what I actually needed to know in order to capture this photo. That’s why the technical stuff matters.

3. Conclusion

Learning advanced technical information is one of the best ways to be as efficient as possible in the field, internalizing the basic concepts that you’ll use all the time and making them into long-lasting habits.

Then again, I’m not saying that you should take pictures on autopilot; I actually believe that can take a lot of the fun out of photography. If you’re not thinking while you’re in the field, you’re not challenging yourself—but if you’re spending too much time thinking about technical information and camera settings when you’re in a rush, you probably need to practice and read more.

It’s that goal—internalizing and automating the basics as much as possible—that makes it worthwhile to keep learning the super-technical stuff, even if you don’t see yourself using that specific information very often. When you learn high-level techniques, whether or not you actually use them, you’re still reinforcing the knowledge that you need every day.

I know that not everyone will agree, but I firmly believe that technical information will never harm your photography. It doesn’t bog you down to learn about hyperfocal distance or ISO invariance, even if you never use them in the field, and even if (though I think this is rarely the case) they don’t help reinforce the basics.

At the absolute worst, learning about those topics still expands what you know about the world. If your goal is to stay interested and excited about photography, that sounds good enough to me.

About the author: Spencer Cox is a landscape and travel photographer from Franklin, Tennessee. To contact Spencer directly or view more of his work, visit his website at Spencer Cox Photography or follow him on Facebook. This article was also published here.



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An Interview with with Ming Thein, the New Chief of Strategy for Hasselblad

The biggest photography announcement of the week came from Hasselblad. In a move that is being praised by most of the photo community, the storied camera company appointed photographer Ming Thein as its new Chief of Strategy, leaving us all to wonder “what happens now?” PetaPixel sat down with Ming to find out.

PetaPixel: First of all, congratulations on the new position! This is a big deal. Can you tell us how this came about? 

Ming Thein: Thank you. A case of right place, right time—I visited HQ in January this year as a quick stop on one of my work trips, had some very positive discussions, and they realized my experience could be useful beyond just brand representation as an ambassador. One thing lead to the next, and next thing I know I’m being given a set of keys and an email address…

You’re a very talented photographer and blogger, but how has your professional background and education prepared you for this position?

I wasn’t always a photographer. In a previous life, I served as senior management for multinational companies in various sectors, headed M&A and private equity teams and had a stint at The Boston Consulting Group; nearly ten years in all. So, beyond the photography—I also have some experience at making the numbers work.

Actually, the label of blogger is the one I have the most trouble with—writing is something I did both with the aim of education and also better understanding why we shoot and how we see. It has never been my primary objective (or even profession; that implies making a living out of it)—it was always photography and image-making first, and still is. But there’s no question that interacting with the audience—something like 100,000 comments in the last five years—has allowed me to build a relationship with the photographic community that reaches quite far.

Do you think other photo companies will follow suit and also appoint photographers in their corporate ranks?

I’m sure the other companies must already have some employees with some level of photographic experience; surely it would be strange if you made a product but didn’t really have anybody who used it in its intended function before releasing it?

Hasselblad went through a few rough years, followed by something of a renaissance. What will be your first order of business as the Chief of Strategy?

To thoroughly investigate and understand the answer to your next question: you can’t make positive changes in direction without knowing exactly where you are now.

What are Hasselblad’s greatest strengths? Weaknesses?

Pending further investigation for the reasons explained in my previous answer—it’s a company with a rich history and focus on making the best—this is important because it defines corporate culture, and that’s the hardest thing to change. It’s a very warm, personal company—in a way that you can put a face to who does what and you can’t with a larger organization. I felt as a customer the team were my friends—this experience is something I would love to extend to even more people.

The core product is solid, and I believe still overall the best quality-focused solution—this is why I personally switched systems last year—which means there’s a good platform to build on. The greatest weakness is probably also the greatest strength: there’s so much more we can still do. And this is true across everything—product-wise, service-wise, pricing-wise.

What kind of impact do you think you can have on those weaknesses (and the company’s direction in general) in your new position?

My role is to provide an alternative point of view biased from the standpoint of the customer and their experience; it’s also to balances wishes and desires with commercial/engineering reality. And, to ask what else can we do? What would a photographer want to have on the wish list?

Moreover: what if we stretched the imagination a bit? Photographic capabilities have evolved, but cameras fundamentally haven’t, meaning it isn’t as easy to deploy all of that potential as it could be.

Former company CEO Perry Oosting said, “we want to attract new customers.” What does Hasselblad have to do in order to become accessible to a broader audience? 

One main thing, I think: dispel the myth that medium format equals difficult and inaccessible. Part of it is education, part of it is engineering and design, part of it is product positioning and concept. The X1D was a great start, and has made a clear impact on the industry: it’s the perfect time to take it further.

Are you still going to try out and comment on other camera brands? Are you worried at all about conflicts of interest here?

No, and I said as much on my site announcement: as you rightly point out, it would be a huge conflict of interest. In any case, I’ve reviewed very little equipment over the last year and focused more on the philosophy of how we see and how we shoot. I don’t think it makes sense to review something you don’t use, and buying gear to review is a very poor business proposition.

A clear example of this: I made a huge commitment at the start of last year—before any affiliation with the company—to switch primary system to Hasselblad on the basis of that system fitting my requirements best. If you understand what your creative objectives are, it’s easy to make choices even if they are unconventional, be it me with the H6D-100c for documentary work or Gian Paul Lozza with the X1D for winter action. Sometimes such choices are required to enable something creatively different.

One has to be careful with reviews: every photographer has very different objectives, and bench tests aren’t really representative of actual conditions. The best benchmark for whether a review is applicable to you or not is whether the reviewer is making the kind of images you want to make—otherwise the application is simply too different.

To that end, any thoughts on Fuji’s new mirrorless medium format offering, the GFX 50s?

Competition is good! It keeps us challenged, and opens up the market because more people are now looking at medium format. Each camera has its strengths and weaknesses—there is never a one-size-fits-all. I’ve always encouraged physically handling and shooting with a camera where possible before committing—spec sheets don’t say everything, and the haptics are just as important as the feature sets, if not more so.

Something that’s technically great, but not so comfortable or logical in operation, might not inspire any deep feelings, but a camera that feels great will be something you want to handle and shoot with, and more images will eventually mean better images.

Okay, you know we have to ask. Can you give us any hints at what’s coming up from Hasselblad? No specifics necessarily, just… a hint or two at the direction of the company?

Continued development of the X and H systems, of course, products beyond that… well, you’ll have to wait and see. But I can safely say they’ll be 100% in-house and unique to us. MT

A huge thanks to Ming for taking the time to answer a few questions for us (and for allaying any fears that Hasselblad might start making re-brands again). To follow along with his personal and professional work, be sure to visit and bookmark his website, and give him a follow on Facebook.



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The history of selfies is a real exhibit in a posh London museum


If you’ve ever wanted to see Instagram selfies placed on equal footing with Van Gogh, London’s Saatchi Gallery has you covered. The Saatchi Gallery is hosting an exhibit called “From Selfie to Self-Expression” which compares form of self-portraiture across history. Standout names on display are Rembrandt, Van Gogh, and Kardashian. Visitors will be able to “like” the old artwork on digital screens in the way they’d like a pic on social media. I’m pretty sure there are several art history Instagram accounts that have beat this exhibit in that regard, though with less irony. The exhibit ends with a semi-political…

This story continues at The Next Web

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Trans People Read Kind Comments They've Received From Strangers In Heartwarming Video

Trans leaders including YouTube star Gigi Gorgeous, “Transparent” actress Alexandra Gray, photographer Amos Mac and writer and producer Jacob Tobia, along with many others, have come together with GLAAD and Instagram to release an inspiring new video and photography series in honor of Transgender Day Of Visibility.


According to an email sent to The Huffington Post, the project, known as #KindComments, “captures the moment of love, support, and visibility as these trans advocates and influencers read aloud inspiring Instagram comments that have posted from their followers on their accounts.”




“For trans day of visibility, I wanted to work with Instagram to draw attention to the resilience of trans people, to the fact that we love and support each other no matter what,” Tobia told The Huffington Post. “By focusing on the ways that trans folks are affirming each other online, this video serves as a sort of love letter to trans people around the world.”


Mac added, “It was so inspiring to photograph this group ― some whom I consider to be friends and peers, along with folks I was just meeting for the first time whose stories I’ve followed for awhile. You could feel the love in the room!”


Check out the video above and Mac’s photos from the series below. For more on Trans Day of Visiblity, head here.



















-- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.



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Exclusive: First tenant signs for Miamisburg spec building

A commercial photography and video production firm will be the first tenant at a Miamisburg speculative building. AGI Studios plans to move down Byers Road to lease part of a 60,000-square-foot building developed by Mark Fornes Realty and Construction Managers of Ohio. Chris Mathews, vice president with AGI Studios, said the newly built office will have a more efficient layout that fits with the way the business has streamlined over the years. "We've found a way to streamline, so where we used…

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Cruel Kodak prank pretends to wipe peoples phones to make a strong point

While it’s not quite April 1st in London yet, Kodak Moments UK were a little eager with the pranks. They took to the streets of London to get people try out a “super fast phone charger”, which would then wipe all the data on their phone before their eyes. This one seems particularly cruel and […]

The post Cruel Kodak prank pretends to wipe peoples phones to make a strong point appeared first on DIY Photography.



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Cruel Kodak prank pretends to wipe peoples phones to make a strong point

While it’s not quite April 1st in London yet, Kodak Moments UK were a little eager with the pranks. They took to the streets of London to get people try out a “super fast phone charger”, which would then wipe all the data on their phone before their eyes. This one seems particularly cruel and […]

The post Cruel Kodak prank pretends to wipe peoples phones to make a strong point appeared first on DIY Photography.



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How do you pronounce “Bokeh?” Here’s how you should

When you see the word “bokeh” written, you probably see an image in your head to associate it with the word. But when you read it out loud, how do you do it? Is it “boh-key,” “boh-kuh,” “boo-kay” or something else? Guys from Photogearnews asked photographers at The Photography Show how they pronounce it. There […]

The post How do you pronounce “Bokeh?” Here’s how you should appeared first on DIY Photography.



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How do you pronounce “Bokeh?” Here’s how you should

When you see the word “bokeh” written, you probably see an image in your head to associate it with the word. But when you read it out loud, how do you do it? Is it “boh-key,” “boh-kuh,” “boo-kay” or something else? Guys from Photogearnews asked photographers at The Photography Show how they pronounce it. There […]

The post How do you pronounce “Bokeh?” Here’s how you should appeared first on DIY Photography.



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NASA’s $1bn Juno probe just sent back the most amazing images of Jupiter so far

When we hear about “probes” flying around space, we probably think of something fairly small. We’ve all heard them on sci-fi TV shows. “Sent out a probe”, and off flies a little drone-like object. Well, not NASA’s Juno probe. This thing is as big as a basketball court. Launched in 2011, the probe took five years […]

The post NASA’s $1bn Juno probe just sent back the most amazing images of Jupiter so far appeared first on DIY Photography.



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NASA’s $1bn Juno probe just sent back the most amazing images of Jupiter so far

When we hear about “probes” flying around space, we probably think of something fairly small. We’ve all heard them on sci-fi TV shows. “Sent out a probe”, and off flies a little drone-like object. Well, not NASA’s Juno probe. This thing is as big as a basketball court. Launched in 2011, the probe took five years […]

The post NASA’s $1bn Juno probe just sent back the most amazing images of Jupiter so far appeared first on DIY Photography.



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Off-grid shipping container cabin has a warm wooden interior

YAMAMAR Design, container cabin, shipping container architecture, shipping container home, green design, sustainable design, diy home design, shipping container cabins, reclaimed Douglas fir, cabin design, reclaimed materials, california cabins, solar power, hunting cabins, mount lassen, mountain cabins, green design

Shipping container residences can be elaborate and complex, but sometimes bringing it back to basics is the key to good living. At the request of their client, San Francisco-based architects YAMAMAR created a simple, off-grid container cabin getaway out of two repurposed shipping containers tucked into a pristine natural forest in North California’s Mount Lassen area.

The container cabin is located on 1,000 acres of pristine wilderness. The idyllic location is next to an old creek bed with amazing sunset views of the surroundings. At the request of the property owner, who had been previously using an old Fleetwood trailer to sleep on site, the new structure had to fit into this natural area by operating completely off-grid. Working within the restrictions set by the local nature conservancy for permanent structures, the team began by customizing two shipping containers off site. This reduced the project’s overall footprint and production costs.

Related: A glazed container cabin that reflects the Colorado sky

YAMAMAR Design, container cabin, shipping container architecture, shipping container home, green design, sustainable design, diy home design, shipping container cabins, reclaimed Douglas fir, cabin design, reclaimed materials, california cabins, solar power, hunting cabins, mount lassen, mountain cabins, green design

Once fused together, the new cabin was built out with simple materials such as reclaimed Douglas fir panels on the flooring and walls. To generate power, a solar array was installed on the roof, but the home uses propane for most of its lighting and heating needs. The adjacent creek is the home’s natural source for fresh water.

YAMAMAR Design, container cabin, shipping container architecture, shipping container home, green design, sustainable design, diy home design, shipping container cabins, reclaimed Douglas fir, cabin design, reclaimed materials, california cabins, solar power, hunting cabins, mount lassen, mountain cabins, green design

In contrast to some luxury dwellings found in the world of shipping container design, this off-grid cabin was meant to offer the basics and keep the focus on the amazing setting. The compact interior is equipped with a small kitchen and one bedroom with a large window that offers incredible views. Two sliding doors on either side of the home roll open on castors and can be locked up tight when not in use.

+ YAMAMAR Design

Via  Dwell

Photography by Bruce Damonte

YAMAMAR Design, container cabin, shipping container architecture, shipping container home, green design, sustainable design, diy home design, shipping container cabins, reclaimed Douglas fir, cabin design, reclaimed materials, california cabins, solar power, hunting cabins, mount lassen, mountain cabins, green design

YAMAMAR Design, container cabin, shipping container architecture, shipping container home, green design, sustainable design, diy home design, shipping container cabins, reclaimed Douglas fir, cabin design, reclaimed materials, california cabins, solar power, hunting cabins, mount lassen, mountain cabins, green design

YAMAMAR Design, container cabin, shipping container architecture, shipping container home, green design, sustainable design, diy home design, shipping container cabins, reclaimed Douglas fir, cabin design, reclaimed materials, california cabins, solar power, hunting cabins, mount lassen, mountain cabins, green design

YAMAMAR Design, container cabin, shipping container architecture, shipping container home, green design, sustainable design, diy home design, shipping container cabins, reclaimed Douglas fir, cabin design, reclaimed materials, california cabins, solar power, hunting cabins, mount lassen, mountain cabins, green design



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Why the Technical Stuff Matters in Photography

Along with normal how-to articles and essays, I’ve always liked reading and writing very technical, nitty-gritty articles about photography — sometimes, articles on topics that rarely come up while actually taking pictures. In fact, I usually don’t even use my own sharpest aperture charts in the field, as useful as they are, since I don’t […]

The post Why the Technical Stuff Matters in Photography appeared first on DIY Photography.



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Top 18 tips for taking magnificent sunset photos

When you read or hear the expression, “Photography is all about light,” you clearly understand the definition of each word; however, the true meaning from a photography perspective can be elusive. It takes time to fully grasp. I clearly remember my first true photography experiment that accelerated my understanding of the basics of photography in […]

The post Top 18 tips for taking magnificent sunset photos appeared first on DIY Photography.



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Top 18 tips for taking magnificent sunset photos

When you read or hear the expression, “Photography is all about light,” you clearly understand the definition of each word; however, the true meaning from a photography perspective can be elusive. It takes time to fully grasp. I clearly remember my first true photography experiment that accelerated my understanding of the basics of photography in […]

The post Top 18 tips for taking magnificent sunset photos appeared first on DIY Photography.



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Thursday, March 30, 2017

Tabitha Soren documented in photos what happened after Moneyball

Tabitha Soren Baseball

Tabitha Soren, who you may remember as a reporter for MTV News, has for the past number of years been working as a photographer. One of her projects began more than 13 years ago as she accompanied her husband Michael Lewis on his visits to the Oakland A’s while working on Moneyball. After the book was published, Soren kept returning to photograph the up-and-coming players Lewis had profiled, following their careers as they either made it in the big leagues or didn’t.

Since then, she has followed the players through their baseball lives, an alternate reality of long bus rides, on-field injuries, friendships and marriages entered and exited, constant motion, and very hard work, often for very little return. Some of the subjects, like Nick Swisher and Joe Blanton, have gone on to become well-known, respected players at the highest level of the game. Some left baseball to pursue other lines of work, such as selling insurance and coal mining. Others have struggled with poverty and even homelessness.

The culmination of the project was a gallery show called Fantasy Life, which is now being released as a book.

Tags: baseball   books   Fantasy Life   Michael Lewis   Moneyball   photography   sports   Tabitha Soren

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22 Stunning Photos From The 2017 Sony World Photography Awards


Some of the world’s best contemporary photographs have been revealed.


Over the last few months, photographers from across the globe submitted 105,000 entries to the 2017 Sony World Photography Awards’ “open” competition, spanning 10 different categories including “wildlife,” “portrait” and “street photography.”


On March 28, Sony announced its 10 winners — and their work is striking.


Each winner received a Sony α7 II with lens kit and will go on to compete for the title of 2017 Sony World Photography Awards’ Open Photographer of the Year, which will be announced on April 20.


Below are the 10 winners’ photos and a few of the competition’s finalists that were too stunning not to include:




Tina Fey, Alec Baldwin, Mahershala Ali, Amy Poehler and a whole host of other stars are teaming up for Stand for Rights: A Benefit for the ACLU. Join us at 7 p.m. Eastern on Friday, March 31 on Facebook Live




You can support the ACLU right away. Text POWER to 20222 to give $10 to the ACLU. The ACLU will call you to explain other actions you can take to help. Visit www.hmgf.org/t for terms. #StandForRights2017







-- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.



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Don't Miss Upcoming Ann Boyd Wade Fine Art and Photography Show - Willcox Range News

It's almost here! The Ann Boyd Wade Fine Art and Photography Show will be open to the public Friday, April 7, from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m., as well as Saturday, April 8, from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m., and Sunday, April 9, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., at the Willcox ...



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Photographer Transforms Real Pictures Into Quirky Scenes with Paper Cutouts

Rich McCor, a London-based paper artist and photographer better known as @paperboyo, is taking the Internet by storm with his creative paper creations. Using black paper cutouts, he transforms landmarks and everyday scenes into something totally different and wacky.

Like other creative Instagrammers before him—check out this link or this one if you want more crafty creations like these—McCor uses forced perspective photography to combine something he made, in this case hand-crafted paper cutouts, with real-world scenes.

Here are 15 of our favorite photos he’s posted to his extremely popular Instagram account.

To see more images like these, or follow along as McCor creates even more mashups, head over to his Instagram account and click that Follow button.

(via Colossal)

Image credits: All photographs by Rich McCor and used with permission.



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Library of Congress Acquires Massive Archive of Iconic Civil Rights Photos by Bob Adelman

The Library of Congress recently acquired the archives of civil rights photographer Bob Adelman. An anonymous donor gifted the collection, an archive that contains some of the most outstanding images ever captured of the Civil Rights Movement.

The LoC received 575,000 images in all, including 50,000 prints and hundreds of thousands of negatives and slides that will now be added to the Library’s collection of over 16 million photographs, drawings, and prints that span a piece of history from the 15th century to the present day.

Photographer/documentarian Bob Adelman during the Selma to Montgomery march. 1965.

Adelman (1930-2016) was born in New York City, and made his name photographing many of the most important leaders and events of the Civil Rights Movement in the 1960s.

He stood mere feet from Dr. King as he delivered his “I have a dream” speech, and documented everything from lunch counter protests, to police attacks with dogs and fire hoses against protesters in Birmingham, to the 54-mile march from Selma, Alabama to Montgomery.

Here’s just a small selection of some of his best-known Civil Rights imagery:

The Dreamer dreams: King ends his speech with the words of the old Negro spiritual, “Free at last! Free at last! Thank God Almighty, we are free at last!” Washington, D.C. 1963 MLK_Funeral_052-10 001 Reverend Carter, expecting a visit from the Klan after he has dared to register to vote, stands guard on his front porch, West Feliciana Parish, Louisiana. 1964.

“After Reverend Carter had registered to vote, that night vigilant neighbors scattered in the woods near his farmhouse, which was at the end of a long dirt road, to help him if trouble arrived. ‘If they want a fight, we’ll fight,’ Joe Carter told me. ‘If I have to die, I’d rather die for right.’ “He told me, ‘I value my life more since I became a registered voter. A man is not a first-class citizen, a number one citizen, unless he is a voter.’ After Election Day came and went, Reverend Carter added, ‘I thanked the Lord that he let me live long enough to vote.’” Honored guest, Rosa Parks, heroin of the Movement, awaits the opening remarks. Washington D.C. Augist 28, 1963 First Women’s Lib march on 5th ave, New York City. August, 1970 John Lewis chairman of SNCC arrises to address the March. All of 22 at the time he had just returned from having his militant speach severly edited by his elders. No man is an island, Kelly Ingram Park, Birmingham, Alabama. 1963.

“The police and firemen used a brute show of force to try to stop the ongoing demonstrations. It didn’t work on this day. Rather than fleeing, the protestors hung on to each other and were able to stand up to the full fury of the water, though not without casualties. I have never witnessed such cruelty. There was almost as much moisture behind the lens as in front. I gave a print of this picture to Dr. King. He studied it and said, ‘I am startled that out of so much pain some beauty came.” – Bob Adelman

Adelman studied law at Harvard and philosophy at Columbia before becoming a photographer. “When I photographed, I was intent on telling the truth as best I saw it and then to help in doing something about it,” he once said. “It was a constant effort not only to document in as honest a way as I could, and to make what I was seeing vivid, but to figure out how to change things.”

The great photographer died tragically almost a year ago at the age of 85. His mentor, Ralph Ellison, once said, “Adelman has moved beyond the familiar clichés of most documentary photography into that rare sphere wherein technical ability and social vision combine to create a work of art.”

Unfortunately, it was not announced when this massive archive of Adelman’s work would be made available to the public, but we’ll be keeping an eye on the LoC’s archives moving forward, and you should too.

(via PDN)

Image credits: All photographs provided by the Library of Congress and used with permission.



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