Tuesday, February 28, 2017

Tokyo's Five Best Photography Locations - Fstoppers

Being a cityscape and street portrait photographer I am always looking for ways to best combine these two genres of travel photography. It goes without saying that Tsukiji fish market is also on the list but I have not included here. However, you can ...



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Making Money With Your Drone Photography Through Adobe Stock - Fstoppers

Ever since I got my drone, I basically keep it in my car at all times in case I happen upon some cool spot while driving. It turns out that all these random excursions have become something very useful to me: profitable stock photography. We all know ...



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Winners Named in 8th Annual Fine Art Photography Competition - Virginia Connection Newspapers

William Toti, who had never before entered a photo competition, stands beside his photo, “Serpentine Vapors at Yosemite,” selected as the 1st place winner in ArtSpace Herndon's 8th Annual Photography Competition & Exhibit. The call for art drew 225 ...



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Turchin Center hosts Appalachian Mountain Photography Competition and Pieces of the Puzzle: Community Outreach - Appalachian State University

BOONE, N.C.—Two exhibitions that occur annually at Appalachian State University's Turchin Center for the Visual Arts, “Appalachian Mountain Photography Competition” (AMPC) and “Pieces of the Puzzle: Community Outreach,” will open on March 3, which ...



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Architects transform an old hay barn into a stunning minimalist home

OFIS Architects have converted an old hay barn in Slovenia into a gorgeous living space. The barn was originally used to house cattle on the first floor and store hay on the upper level, but had been left empty for years. To convert the space into a comfortable loft space without sacrificing the building's local vernacular, the architects were determined to use as much as the existing structure as possible.

Architecture, locally sourced materials, green design, interior design, repurposed materials, green renovations, barn renovations, barn renovation, ofis architects, moveable walls, Gallery, carousel showcase, barn design, wood architecture, sliding walls, repurposed barns, Ambienti, barn homes, slovenian architecture, green barn renovations, loft designsArchitecture, locally sourced materials, green design, interior design, repurposed materials, green renovations, barn renovations, barn renovation, ofis architects, moveable walls, Gallery, carousel showcase, barn design, wood architecture, sliding walls, repurposed barns, Ambienti, barn homes, slovenian architecture, green barn renovations, loft designsArchitecture, locally sourced materials, green design, interior design, repurposed materials, green renovations, barn renovations, barn renovation, ofis architects, moveable walls, Gallery, carousel showcase, barn design, wood architecture, sliding walls, repurposed barns, Ambienti, barn homes, slovenian architecture, green barn renovations, loft designsArchitecture, locally sourced materials, green design, interior design, repurposed materials, green renovations, barn renovations, barn renovation, ofis architects, moveable walls, Gallery, carousel showcase, barn design, wood architecture, sliding walls, repurposed barns, Ambienti, barn homes, slovenian architecture, green barn renovations, loft designsArchitecture, locally sourced materials, green design, interior design, repurposed materials, green renovations, barn renovations, barn renovation, ofis architects, moveable walls, Gallery, carousel showcase, barn design, wood architecture, sliding walls, repurposed barns, Ambienti, barn homes, slovenian architecture, green barn renovations, loft designsArchitecture, locally sourced materials, green design, interior design, repurposed materials, green renovations, barn renovations, barn renovation, ofis architects, moveable walls, Gallery, carousel showcase, barn design, wood architecture, sliding walls, repurposed barns, Ambienti, barn homes, slovenian architecture, green barn renovations, loft designsArchitecture, locally sourced materials, green design, interior design, repurposed materials, green renovations, barn renovations, barn renovation, ofis architects, moveable walls, Gallery, carousel showcase, barn design, wood architecture, sliding walls, repurposed barns, Ambienti, barn homes, slovenian architecture, green barn renovations, loft designsArchitecture, locally sourced materials, green design, interior design, repurposed materials, green renovations, barn renovations, barn renovation, ofis architects, moveable walls, Gallery, carousel showcase, barn design, wood architecture, sliding walls, repurposed barns, Ambienti, barn homes, slovenian architecture, green barn renovations, loft designs

The Slovenian countryside is full of decrepit barns that serve as symbols of the country's rural lifestyle. To pay respects to the local vernacular, the architects made impressive strides to use what they could of the barn's original materials.

Related: Architects transform 18th century barn with seamless contemporary extension

Surprisingly, the renovation team was able to maintain almost all of the external wooden cladding and concrete roof slates. A few strategic renovations were made to include windows and an opening for the front porch to let in natural light to the home, and a ramp that previously led animals into the barn was also fixed to serve the same purpose for the new, human inhabitant.

https://youtu.be/cBDAeyO7WC0

Inside, the home has an open floor plan with minimal furnishings and exposed wooden beams. The interior floors, walls and furniture are covered in locally-sourced spruce panels, resulting in a homey cabin feel. The open living and dining area make up the main volume, and a raised bedroom was installed in the back. The kitchen, sauna, fireplace and bathroom are all strategically placed out of sight behind a wall of sliding vertical planks to further open the living space.

+ OFIS Architects

Via Ambienti TV

Photography by Tomaž Gregorič



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Musubi maker buys Fujifilm's Hawaii office property

A Japanese wholesale food company that makes the Spam musubi sold at 7-Eleven stores in Hawaii has purchased Japan-based Fujifilm Corp.’s Hawaii regional office in Central Oahu, effectively ending the photography and imaging giant’s longtime run in the state, Pacific Business News has learned. The purchase price was not immediately known. The property has a total assessed value of about $11.8 million, public records show. Fujifilm closed its Hawaii office at the end of 2016 and sold its property…

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Listen: some of the most talented photographers of today talk about industry secrets in free podcast

If you like listening high-quality podcast about photography, there’s a real treat for you on RGGEDU. Gary Martin and Rob Grimm talk with some of the most talented and famous photographers of today. There will be four seasons in total, and Season 1 is ready for free download or streaming. Rob and Gary sat down to chat with […]

The post Listen: some of the most talented photographers of today talk about industry secrets in free podcast appeared first on DIY Photography.



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Hasselblad Announces 4 New Lenses for Mirrorless X1D: 3 Primes, 1 Zoom

Hasselblad doesn’t want to lose the momentum they gained by being the first to announce a mirrorless medium-format digital camera system with their exciting X1D. Which is why they’ve decided to announce not one, not two, not even three, but four lenses for the new system coming in 2017. One is available today.

The announcement is one fourth real news and three fourths teaser, but we’ll let this one slide. The four lenses announced are the XCD 35-75mm Zoom, XCD 65mm, XCD 22mm Wide Angle, and XCD 120mm f/3.5 Macro lenses, but only the 120mm Macro is getting here any time soon. Here’s a closer look at this lens:

“Providing a new versatility to the X1D user, the lens is suitable for both close-up work up to a 1:2 image scale, and also as a mid-range telephoto lens for portrait or other photography requiring a longer focal length,” writes Hasselblad by way of introduction to the new lens. “Auto or manual focusing goes from infinity to 1:2 without the need for extension tubes.”

Inside the lens, you’ll find an integral central shutter that allows flash synchronization up to 1/2000th of a second, and an aperture that goes from f/3.5 all the way to f/35. More detailed specs such as number of elements and groups, special elements, coatings, etc. were not mentioned in the specs Hasselblad sent us, and the official product page has yet to go live as of this writing.

The 120mm f/3.5 Macro is scheduled to arrive in June, although no price has been provided just yet. It brings the X1D-specific XCD lens line up to 4 lenses, and “by the beginning of 2018” Hasselblad promises to add three more lenses to the line—the aforementioned 35-75mm, 65mm, and 22mm—for a total of 7 dedicated XCD lenses.

Keep an eye on this page for more information about this lens… hopefully soon.



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10 reasons why this photographer switched from Canon to Sony

I know, I get it, you’re sick of all the “why I switched” posts, already. But, photographer Francisco Hernandez has some pretty compelling reasons for his switch from the Canon 6D to the Sony A7RII. Of course, the reason why anybody switches to or even initially chooses a particular brand or body are often personal […]

The post 10 reasons why this photographer switched from Canon to Sony appeared first on DIY Photography.



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10 reasons why this photographer switched from Canon to Sony

I know, I get it, you’re sick of all the “why I switched” posts, already. But, photographer Francisco Hernandez has some pretty compelling reasons for his switch from the Canon 6D to the Sony A7RII. Of course, the reason why anybody switches to or even initially chooses a particular brand or body are often personal […]

The post 10 reasons why this photographer switched from Canon to Sony appeared first on DIY Photography.



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Sony Xperia XZ Review

Sony Xperia XZ Review thumbnail

The Sony Xperia XZ is a new photography-focused premium smartphone, featuring a 23-megapixel primary camera with a 1/2.3"-type Exmor RS imaging chip. Read our in-depth Sony Xperia XZ review now...

Read the review »



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The Oscar Announcement blunder was probably caused by a photo of Emma Stone

The Internet is flooded with reactions about the Oscar best Picture gaffe, and the explanation is finally here. People have been speculating what went wrong that evening, and I’ve heard a bunch of theories since this historic mistake happened. But it turns out the whole mess was because of one photo and tweet of Best […]

The post The Oscar Announcement blunder was probably caused by a photo of Emma Stone appeared first on DIY Photography.



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The Oscar Announcement blunder was probably caused by a photo of Emma Stone

The Internet is flooded with reactions about the Oscar best Picture gaffe, and the explanation is finally here. People have been speculating what went wrong that evening, and I’ve heard a bunch of theories since this historic mistake happened. But it turns out the whole mess was because of one photo and tweet of Best […]

The post The Oscar Announcement blunder was probably caused by a photo of Emma Stone appeared first on DIY Photography.



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Elinchrom literally launches the new ELB 1200 with amazing mid-air photo shoot

It’s become pretty clear by now that Elinchrom really like testing the limits of their gear. They’ve put them on drones, battled oceans, and lit up ice tunnels. So, for the launch of the new Elinchrom ELB 1200 pack, they had to go pretty crazy. And crazy is exactly where they went, strapping the new […]

The post Elinchrom literally launches the new ELB 1200 with amazing mid-air photo shoot appeared first on DIY Photography.



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Sony might be getting ready to announce a new A7 camera next month

Normally, I don’t pay that much attention to rumours. But this is a rumour-not-rumour-sort-of-a-maybe-leak kinda thing. It may simply just be a typo. But, the good folks at The Photography Show have released their official preview mini-guide to this year’s show. Browsing through the guide, you might notice something a little interesting under Sony’s listing on […]

The post Sony might be getting ready to announce a new A7 camera next month appeared first on DIY Photography.



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Impulse buys and sealed white cubes: inside the world's greatest photography collections - The Guardian

Wilson cuts a similar figure in the world of photography: hugely influential, yet content to remain an eminence grise. Since the 80s, his enthusiasm for collecting photographs has grown enormously, in tandem with the prices such works can now fetch at ...



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The Real Reason You Suck on Photo Sharing Sites – The Bots are Beating You

Photographers join photo-sharing sites for a variety of reasons. Sometimes it’s as simple as a need for recognition and the occasional pat-on-the-back. In fact I suspect that’s the reason most people join these sites in the first place; a little bit of recognition is worth big dollars in the feel-good bank. Sometimes they join those […]

The post The Real Reason You Suck on Photo Sharing Sites – The Bots are Beating You appeared first on DIY Photography.



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Hands on with the Godox Witstro AD200 Strobe

As we reported a few weeks ago, Godox has launched new Witstro AD200 Modular Strobe. It’s also called 200x or eVolv 200, so if you see it under these names – have in mind it’s the same thing. If you’re thinking of investing in one, we’re sharing a review from photographer Robert Hall. As I […]

The post Hands on with the Godox Witstro AD200 Strobe appeared first on DIY Photography.



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Monday, February 27, 2017

Ren Hang: Death of China's hotshot erotic photographer - BBC News

The Chinese art world was rocked over the weekend by news that famed erotic photographer Ren Hang had died at the age of 29. Known for his provocative pictures and poetry, Ren's often explicit work had been exhibited in galleries all over the world.
An interview with Ren Hang British Journal of Photography

all 5 news articles »


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Entries being accepted through Tuesday for photography show - Artesia Daily Press

Those who may not be photographers but who are art enthusiasts are encouraged to stop by the OPAC gallery from 11 a.m. – 6 p.m. Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays and 11 a.m. – 3 p.m. Wednesdays, or two hours prior to any scheduled show, to vote for ...



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The photography of Joel Woods - WCSH6.com

Woods captures stunning pictures from and around the boats he's working on. He gets storms, calm seas, people, wildlife. Nothing escapes his lens. Although sometimes his lenses escape him. The rough seas have been known to knock him overboard, ...

and more »


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Peter MacKeith photography exhibit opens for First Friday - youralaskalink

MacKeith was a geoscientist and UAF doctoral student best known for his love of Alaska's wilderness and talent for photography. The "2017 Peter MacKeith Memorial Photography Exhibition: Ascension" will open March 3, with a reception in Wood Center's ...



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Here are some reasons why you should love a cheap kit lens

When you bought your first DSLR, you probably got it with a kit lens. These lenses are cheap, and not really top-notch quality. If you bought a prime or a high-end zoom later, you know a kit lens can’t beat it. However, there are still some reasons to use a kit lens. They may not […]

The post Here are some reasons why you should love a cheap kit lens appeared first on DIY Photography.



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Here are some reasons why you should love a cheap kit lens

When you bought your first DSLR, you probably got it with a kit lens. These lenses are cheap, and not really top-notch quality. If you bought a prime or a high-end zoom later, you know a kit lens can’t beat it. However, there are still some reasons to use a kit lens. They may not […]

The post Here are some reasons why you should love a cheap kit lens appeared first on DIY Photography.



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Kodak Ektar 100: An Ideal, Affordable Film for Landscape Photography

In this article, we won’t be talking about cameras and film only. Today I also want to share with you a beautiful region of Ireland that I discovered recently. It’s called the Ring of Kerry. But before we start our exploration of the Emerald Island, let me introduce our travel buddy: Kodak Ektar 100.

If you are not familiar with Ektar yet, it’s a fantastic colour negative film for those of you who are into deep colour saturation and high contrast.

Some compare it to slide film because of that, but the main advantage is that it’s a C41 film, which means that it can be developed anywhere for cheap, unlike slide films. The other advantage on top of slide films is the extended dynamic range—Ektar is capable of retaining more information, in both highlights and shadows, when capturing highly contrasty scenes.

The only downside I can think of is when capturing skin tones. It tends to give a reddish colour to white skins, which is not the most pleasing when shooting portraits. I know some photographers who get great results using this film for portraits, but I haven’t found the magic recipe yet (you’ll be the first to know when I get my hands on it!). If you are more into muted colours and natural skins tones, I’d suggest looking at Kodak Portra 160—it also has a very fine grain and is less saturated and contrasty than Ektar.

When underexposed, it tends to give a strong blue cast on your image so, to avoid this, it’s recommended to expose for the shadows. This will ensure that you don’t end up with dark areas that look blue instead of black and it will also warm up the global temperature of your image.

Here is an example of Ektar underexposed. The blue tint is due to the underexposure coupled with the blue hour but you get the idea.

The last point worth mentioning is that Ektar is scanning friendly. It’s honestly a pleasure to scan, as it doesn’t require any colour correction. Not all colour film handles being scanned so well, as you can see in this article where I explain how to correct colour negative scans.

Now that we’ve discussed Ektar, let me talk to you about our destination: The Ring of Kerry.

It’s a circular road 180km long that goes from Kenmare to Killarney. Most of it goes along the coastline of the Iveragh Peninsula and pass through many picturesque villages. The most common attraction are the Gap of Dunloe, Rossbeigh Beach, Moll’s Gap, and Ladies View… just to name a few.

Star Wars fan will also have a chance to visit Skellig Michael, which became popular thanks to the final scene where Luke Skywalker appears at the end of The Force Awakens. To avoid any disappointment, make sure that you plan your visit between the May and end of September—outside of these dates, there is no way to access the island by boat. I learned that the hard way, but it will be a good excuse for another trip around there!

Our first halt takes us on a peaceful tiny pier just outside a village called Sneem. We got there by accident, trying to make a U-turn because we got on the wrong road. We ended up staying there for a while exploring the surrounding woods and enjoying the serene atmosphere.

A few hours later, the weather changed and the clouds took away this stunning blue sky. We had to drive for a while before reaching Caherdaniel and its stunning view. As soon as we got there, the sun broke through the clouds and came out so did my camera!

Then we drove to Foilhommerum Bay on Valentia Island. This was probably my favourite part of the trip. On top of a beautiful location, I had the chance to see one of the most epic light that I have ever seen in my entire life.

In the second picture, you can see on the horizon a tiny island on the right side. This is Skellig Michael that you are looking at!

Our road ended in Killarney for the night, but this day wouldn’t be complete without capturing this delicate and soft sunset on the road.

The following day, we decided to explore the Killarney National Park. It’s right next to Killarney and if you are nearby you can’t do without stopping there for a few hours. Landscapes range from lakes to mountains peaks, and the park has a wide variety of wildlife to offer.

Unfortunately, the day was a bit dull and the light really flat so we stayed around the lake and savoured this time to relax.

The last stop on our short road trip was the Ladies’ View. This place took its name after the visit of Queen Victoria, who decided to make a stop there and enjoyed this scene with the ladies from her court. Unfortunately, this picture doesn’t give the credit this place deserves, but it’s absolutely beautiful and a perfect way to end your trip around the Ring of Kerry.

We were there in the end of January ,which is probably not the ideal season to fully enjoy it. Nevertheless, our eyes got plenty of treats! Before you go, here is a map I created for this trip showing the places worth seeing (although I’m sure there are many more).

About the author: Vincent Moschetti is an Ireland-based photographer who is in the middle of a year-long experiment where he’s shooting only film photography. You can find more of his work or follow along on this adventure by visiting his website or following him on Facebook and Instagram. This post was also published here.



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Oppo's 5X camera system sets extremely high bar for smartphone photography - Digital Trends

It's called 5X, and Oppo describes it as “smartphone photography technology that [gives] users [the] ability to capture highly detailed images.” More specifically, it's a dual camera system that uses a “periscope” structure to divert light through a ...
MWC 2017: OPPO captures future of smartphone photography with its '5x Dual-Camera Zoom' International Business Times, India Edition

all 34 news articles »


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How pro cinema lens techs test their camera lenses with a projector

When most of us are testing out new lenses, it’s often a very subjective thing. And our testing exercises are rarely very scientific. In fact, we may not even notice some issues until we’ve had a lens for a few months. Then, one day, the problem pops up, clear as day. For cinematographers that rely on […]

The post How pro cinema lens techs test their camera lenses with a projector appeared first on DIY Photography.



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How pro cinema lens techs test their camera lenses with a projector

When most of us are testing out new lenses, it’s often a very subjective thing. And our testing exercises are rarely very scientific. In fact, we may not even notice some issues until we’ve had a lens for a few months. Then, one day, the problem pops up, clear as day. For cinematographers that rely on […]

The post How pro cinema lens techs test their camera lenses with a projector appeared first on DIY Photography.



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OPPO Reveals Periscope-Inspired 5x Optical Zoom System for Smartphones

One of the major ways smartphone cameras fall short of even old point-and-shoots is zoom. How are you supposed to squeeze an optical zoom mechanism into that little space? Chinese company OPPO has figured it out.

Using an optical technique we’ve been anticipating for a couple of years now—at least two separate Apple patents described something similar—the manufacturer folded the optical system of its telephoto lens into a periscope-inspired module, giving the tiny optical elements room to move. The module is only 5.7mm tall, because the elements are actually arranged horizontally across the top of the phone—light entering the telephoto lens of the dual camera system doesn’t shoot straight down into a sensor, it is instead diverted into the optics using a prism:

In reality, the horizontal module only gives you 3x optical zoom, but OPPO has upped the ante by combining it with a second, wide-angle camera and some special ‘image fusion technology’ that gets you from 3x to 5x ‘lossless’ zoom. Finally, for the cherry on top of the 5x sundae, OPPO has also integrated optical image stabilization using both the prism and the lens in the telephoto system, promising a 40% improvement over previous OIS implementations… whatever that means.

For people in China, this announcement is an exciting step forward for compact smartphone photography; for us in the States, we’ll just have to wait to see if OPPO licenses this tech to any smartphone makers who actually sell their wares in the US.



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Why your Instagram photos of food may be “racist”

Have you ever thought food photos can be racist? Neither have I. But Portland-based food photographer Celeste Noche declares Instagram food photography to be exactly this – “racist”. In the podcast on The Racist Sandwich, she addresses the issues of racism, as well as gender and class division in Instagram food photography. As a Filipino, […]

The post Why your Instagram photos of food may be “racist” appeared first on DIY Photography.



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A Year After Winning For Portraying A Victim Of Abuse, Brie Larson Hands Casey Affleck An Oscar






At last year’s Academy Awards, Brie Larson took home the Best Actress award for her performance in “Room.” The film by Lenny Abrahamson told the story of a woman called Ma, who we eventually learn had been imprisoned in a small shed years before by a man called Old Nick. Although Nick is only briefly seen, his presence is known by the abuse, sexual and physical, he inflicts on Ma and her young son, Jack.


The actress dove into the role, shutting herself away for a month and meeting with psychologists to understand the trauma of her character. She showed great empathy as she hugged each sexual assault survivor after Lady Gaga’s awareness anthem “Till It Happens to You” as they departed the stage at last year’s ceremony. 


During Sunday night’s Oscars, Larson took the stage again to announce 2017’s Best Actor winner. The honoree? Casey Affleck for his performance in “Manchester by the Sea.” The thing is, Affleck has been surrounded by controversy after 2010 sexual harassment allegations against him leapt back into headlines last fall.


The announcement made for one uncomfortable picture onstage. Although unlike the time she presented Affleck a Golden Globe in January, Larson chose to give the actor a quick hug as she handed over the gold statue.



Yes, Affleck took home an Oscar in spite of the allegations. (Sexual abuse allegations have squashed Oscar hopefuls in the past; “The Birth of a Nation” was pushed aside for its director’s controversy.) During the 2009 production of another film, Affleck allegedly made repeated sexual comments and unwanted sexual advances toward two women, a producer who he’d worked with him for 10 years and the film’s director of photography. They included the accusation that Affleck crawled into one woman’s bed as she slept.


The cases were settled out of court, and this awards season Affleck scored the BAFTA, Golden Globe, Critic’s Choice, Gotham and National Board of Review awards for the role as Hollywood seemed all too happy to overlook Ben Affleck’s brother’s transgressions. 


Then, at Hollywood’s most coveted event, an audience of millions watched a woman who made a wholehearted effort to become familiar with the experience of sexual abuse award a man who’s put all his effort into denying and brushing away accusations of sexual harassment.


It’s true that the allegations against Affleck are far from the scarring experience with which Larson became familiar. But still, although it’s customary for the year’s previous Best Actress winner to award the new Best Actor, the Academy chose to pair the two of them onstage instead of making an exception. In doing so, it sent a disturbing message.


In Hollywood, it seems, sexual harassment is not a serious matter.


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Crashing a drone in Seattle could land you with jail time and a fine

While some of the rules regarding drone flight around the world might seem a little extreme, some make absolute sense. One such law in many countries is that of flying over groups of people. Especially groups of people who aren’t directly involved with the flight. You might remember one drone pilot who disobeyed this rule […]

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The camera matters and here’s why, but it’s not in the way you’re thinking

For as long as I’ve been photographing, I’ve always had a soft spot for gear and the technical side of photography. In the beginning, I was obsessed with getting the best camera I could afford, which ironically was a refurbished entry-level Nikon DSLR – not exactly the pinnacle of camera technology at the time. For […]

The post The camera matters and here’s why, but it’s not in the way you’re thinking appeared first on DIY Photography.



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The camera matters and here’s why, but it’s not in the way you’re thinking

For as long as I’ve been photographing, I’ve always had a soft spot for gear and the technical side of photography. In the beginning, I was obsessed with getting the best camera I could afford, which ironically was a refurbished entry-level Nikon DSLR – not exactly the pinnacle of camera technology at the time. For […]

The post The camera matters and here’s why, but it’s not in the way you’re thinking appeared first on DIY Photography.



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Not-So-Mobile America: What Honolulu and Detroit Residents Have in Common

Not-So-Mobile America: What Honolulu and Detroit Residents Have in Common

Sisoje/iStock; marlenka/iStock

Whether we’re setting out across the country or just changing neighborhoods, upgrading or downsizing—movin’ on up or movin’ on out—the idea of pulling up stakes has always been a core part of the American DNA. Our willingness and eagerness to move is emblematic of our faith in the idea that we can always make a fresh start in a new home.

But actually, we don’t move as often as we used to. Figures for 2015 show that only about 12% of Americans had swapped their address for a new one within the past year. In 1948, when the U.S. Census Bureau first collected moving data, the percentage of those who had moved within the past year was 20%.

We decided to take a look at the U.S. cities that have the most mobile populations—and those where people are most likely to stay in home, sweet home. To gauge which cities had the highest and which had the lowest number of residents moving to new homes—whether across the street or across the country—our data team reviewed the latest U.S. Census Bureau data. For each of the United States’ 100 largest cities, we calculated the percentage of households (both homeowners and renters) that had moved since 2010, to figure out where residents are most mobile.

Then we looked at the places where the largest percentage of households had been in the same home since 1990, to see where folks are staying put.

We found some surprising juxtapositions on our Top 10 “sticking around” list. Do Honolulu and Detroit really have so much in common? Turns out the cities were ranked high on the list for completely different reasons.

“There are two main determining factors whether people move or not,” says Nathalie Williams, a sociology professor from the University of Washington. The good: “The better people feel their lives are going, the less likely they are to move elsewhere.”  The bad: Lousy economies can force people to head for greener pastures.

But of course, economic insecurity can also keep people in the same place.

After the housing bust in 2007, migration slowed down, because uncertainties about the job market had made people nervous about changing jobs and deciding to move on. They were less likely to upgrade to a bigger and nicer home. Plenty even found their homes deep underwater, and were unable to sell.

Now that the recession is over, mobility is finally picking up again, says Kenneth Johnson, a demographer at the University of New Hampshire. And jobs lure people, especially younger ones who haven’t put down deep roots, to new centers of employment.

So where are the folks the most and least mobile? The answers just might surprise you.

longtime-01

Detroit: When the going gets tough, the tough stay put

In the mid-20th century, Detroit, our least mobile city, drew thousands of workers, because it was the home of the Big Three automakers. But as the American auto industry lost market share and began to shed workers, the population dwindled. And while young people are streaming out, many longtime residents are staying put. The Census data show that 21.4% of Detroit families moved into their homes before 1990, the highest percentage in our study.

One reason is that owners are simply stuck in their homes.

About one in five Detroit homes is still seriously underwater, with a loan amount that is at least 25% higher than the property’s market value, according to ATTOM Data Solutions, a real estate information company. The median home value in Wayne County, where Detroit is located, is only $149,602, but the median loan amount is $161,965.

“If your house is upside down, you can’t move. You can abandon your house, but there’s no way to sell it,” says Eli Lehrer, president of R Street Institute, a policy research organization. He notes that people receiving government assistance typically have to reapply if they relocate to another state—and might not qualify, or have their benefits reduced.

Many Detroit residents live and shop near hulking vacant buildings that have been abandoned, overtaken by weeds, graffiti, and trash. But as the city recovers, its longtime residents are an integral part of the city’s growth, says Tahirih Ziegler, executive director of Local Initiatives Support Corporation, which promotes safe communities and affordable housing.

“Longtime residents stabilize their communities by mowing their lawns, keeping properties in good condition, investing in their homes. Overall, that’s helping the city stabilize the population,” Ziegler says.

Similar narratives of decline play out in Midwestern cities like Pittsburgh (No. 3), Cleveland (No. 6), and Toledo, OH (No. 7), after the steel industry’s downfall.

The high costs of moving often prevent the poorest folks from relocating, says retired New York University journalism professor William Serrin. Serrin wrote about the fate of a former steel town outside Pittsburgh in his book “Homestead: The Glory and Tragedy of an American Steel Town.”

“When you are 52 years old and have five kids, you don’t just move to Arizona—it’s just not in the cards,” Serrin says.

On the East Coast, Philadelphia (No. 4) and Baltimore (No. 5) are some of the country’s oldest cities. So it’s no surprise to see generations with deep ties to their metros.

Honolulu: Why ever leave?

Blue ocean waters, soft sand, mountains of Spam, and tropical weather all year round—it makes sense that people wouldn’t want to leave Honolulu, right?

But it also may come down to dollars and cents. The median list price of single-family home in this U.S. paradise is a whopping $730,000, according to realtor.com®. So while longtime homeowners stand to profit if they sell, they might not be able to afford another home in this town—or perhaps anywhere in Hawaii.

In addition, established homeowners benefit from the fact that the 50th state has, by far, the lowest property tax rates in the country.

And the unique culture of Hawaii binds people together.

Leonard Kam, 60, was born in Honolulu and runs Alicia’s Market, a general store that sells Chinese-style roast duck alongside Hawaiian poke bowls of marinated raw fish. His parents, who were originally from China, started the store in 1949 in a small wooden hut. Now Kam’s two sons help him develop new recipes. It’s a third-generation business, Kam says with pride.

“Honolulu is a small community. Everybody knows everybody, we are all family,” says his son Chris Kam. “You don’t move to the mainland unless you have to.”

New York and San Francisco: America’s meccas of the stubborn Once you go BK, you never go back.Once you go BK, you never go back.

Maremagnum/Getty Images

Once a New Yorker, always a New Yorker. Maybe it’s because it’s so hard to find a foothold—or a decent apartment—in this town, just as it is in San Francisco (No. 9). You hang on to what you can get for as long as you can. That’s why, despite skyrocketing home prices and rents, many residents have managed to stay in their homes for decades. And low housing inventories don’t make intercity moves easy.

About 16.1% of New Yorkers and 15.6% of San Franciscans have been living in the same home since 1990, according to Census data. That’s compared with 13% of the population nationally. Yes, gentrification is pricing out longtime residents in some areas, especially renters. But luckily, both cities have rent control or rent stabilization, which keep some renters in their homes.

A certain amount of stubbornness helps too.

Regina Karp, 78, a retired public school teacher, has lived in a rent-controlled apartment on the Upper West Side of Manhattan for 47 years. Her children grew up there and left, her husband passed away, and now she’s living by herself. For two bedrooms, she pays almost $3,000 a month, which she says is her entire pension. Still, she nevertheless refuses to leave.

“This is my apartment. I was born in New York City, I’ve lived here my entire life. All my friends are here. I’m simply not going to live in the middle of a suburb in Jersey,” Karp says.

longtime-02

Orlando: Life beyond Shamu

Outsiders may think of Orlando as the home of Mickey Mouse and poor Shamu, but increasingly, this is the city that leads Florida in job creation. The metro added 50,300 jobs in December, according to the Florida Department of Economic Opportunity.

Health care is one of the fastest-growing local employment sectors: Orlando’s newest asset is a medical research park with a medical school, three major hospitals, and multiple research labs. The city even benefits from the Disney World expansion, including an “Avatar”-themed addition opening in May and a “Star Wars”-themed addition that is in the planning phase.

Orlando sprawlOrlando sprawl

Arrangements-Photography/iStock

All this economic prosperity means that more people are moving here—and those already established may now have the means to upgrade their living situation.

“Economic development is usually glacial, but it’s been like a volcano erupting in Orlando. The development happened very rapidly,” says Sean Snaith, director of the Institute for Economic Competitiveness with the University of Central Florida in Orlando.

Orlando is trying out different remedies for its infamous sprawl, from bike rentals to commuter rail.

Nevada: A good place to start a business

The low cost of living and business-friendly atmosphere also makes Nevada an appealing place to call home. Reno (No. 3), the self-proclaimed “Biggest Little City in the World” has long been better known as a pauper’s version of Las Vegas. But put all that aside: The place is fast becoming a high-tech manufacturing hub. A few miles east of Reno, Tesla’s Gigafactory manufactures batteries for its electric cars.

“We have no corporate tax, no income tax, a very pro-business government,” says Mike Kazmierski, president of the Economic Development Authority of Western Nevada. That makes it easier for newcomers as well as locals to become entrepreneurs.

Big brother Las Vegas (No. 4), too, is adding people in its many master-planned communities. The high cost of living in Los Angeles and San Diego is pushing Californians to look for greener pastures—or even desert living.

Jacob Orth, a 29-year-old hospitality worker, moved to Vegas from San Jose four years ago. At the time he left, San Jose was the most expensive housing market in the country (it still is). Orth says he cut his living costs by half after the move. And he’s not alone—millennials are flocking to Vegas for its abundant entry-level jobs.

“The big secret about the Las Vegas area is that it’s a lot more family-oriented than people realize. The Strip is kind of like its own little world; once you get outside it, life is pretty normal,” says Orth, who writes about Sin City in his blog, “Jacob’s Life in Vegas.”

Not-So-Mobile America: What Honolulu and Detroit Residents Have in CommonLas Vegas

SerrNovik/iStock

Texas’ population boom

It’s hard not to see the appeal of Austin (No. 5): with the booming tech scene, friendly people, great live music, and amazing barbecue, just for starters. No wonder 20-something engineers, boomer corporate hot shots, and even retirees are flocking to the place. And plenty of them live in sweet high-rise apartments that were built over the past decade.

Grandmother Susi Spies moved to Austin two years ago, to be close to her children and their families.

“My children asked me to babysit for them, but I’m too busy having fun [with] food trucks, hiking trails, bat-watching cruises,” says Spies, president of Austin Newcomers, an association that connects new residents with one another and to their new neighborhoods. “It’s an amazing city.”

Texas’ population boom is no secret, but few cities add people as fast as Irving (No. 2), a suburb of Dallas. Home to ExxonMobil, and surrounded by corporation headquarters, like those of AT&T and J.C. Penney, the city’s flourishing job market is powering its exponential growth.

Fast turnover in college towns

Some of America’s most transient cities are college towns. In addition to Austin, there are Irvine, CA (No. 7), Madison, WI (No. 8), and Durham, NC (No. 9). For obvious reasons, incoming students and departing graduates help raise the turnover figures as they move back home or to different parts of the country to start careers.

“College towns are more transient, because new students come every year, and four years later, they are out,” says Realtor Alex Saloutos of First Weber Realtors in Madison. Plus, they tend to move around quite a bit during their tenure. “Students don’t buy homes, they rent.”

The post Not-So-Mobile America: What Honolulu and Detroit Residents Have in Common appeared first on Real Estate News & Advice | realtor.com®.



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How to avoid glare when shooting portraits of people wearing glasses

Whenever I see people posting questions about how to photograph people wearing glasses, they usually receive the same response. “Don’t, have them take their glasses off”. This is usually followed by some silly statement about it being impossible to avoid glare and reflections on glasses. Well, it’s not impossible. It’s actually pretty straightforward. As photographer […]

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How to quickly remove the white outline around your model in Photoshop

If you shoot models on location against a blue sky, you may wish to enhance the sky brightness and tones. If you do it by darkening the sky using Luminosity, it can result in the appearance of a white outline around your model. Emma Grigoryan from Fstoppers shared with us a simple way to get rid of […]

The post How to quickly remove the white outline around your model in Photoshop appeared first on DIY Photography.



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How to quickly remove the white outline around your model in Photoshop

If you shoot models on location against a blue sky, you may wish to enhance the sky brightness and tones. If you do it by darkening the sky using Luminosity, it can result in the appearance of a white outline around your model. Emma Grigoryan from Fstoppers shared with us a simple way to get rid of […]

The post How to quickly remove the white outline around your model in Photoshop appeared first on DIY Photography.



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CP+ 2017 - Sigma interview: 'We’ve learned that some customers require exceptional lens performance'

Kazuto Yamaki, CEO of Sigma Corporation, pictured at CP+ 2017, with Sigma's new 14mm F1.8.

Sigma released four lenses at this year's CP+ show in Yokohama - the 14mm F1.8 DG HSM Art, 24-70mm F2.8 DG OS HSM Art, 135mm F1.8 DG HSM Art and 100-400mm F5-6.3 DG OS HSM. We're at the show, where we made time to sit down with Kazuto Yamaki, CEO of Sigma, to find our more about the new lenses. 

You’ve told me previously that you really want Sigma to make more wideangle lenses. Do you think you’re achieving that goal with the 12-24mm and new 14mm?

Yes, but I’m still not satisfied. I think we need to make more wide-angle lenses. A fast 14mm was one of the lenses that our customers were asking for. Most existing 14mm lenses are F2.8, so F1.8 was a challenge.

The new Sigma 14mm F1.8 is the fastest lens of its kind, and according to Sigma, should outperform competitive, slower designs from other manufacturers.
What have you learned, from making the Art series?

We’ve learned that some customers require exceptional lens performance. We believe that our mission is to make products that other manufacturers don’t have. If we just released similarly-specified lenses to existing models, we wouldn’t be contributing to the industry, or benefiting customers. So our Art series is meant to provide the best performance.

They’re bulky and heavy, it’s true, but our customers like them because of the performance. That’s what we learned.

Hands-on with Sigma MC-11 (CP+ 2016)
You now make a mount adapter for Sony E-mount, but are you planning native support for the Sony E-mount in the future?

Yes, that’s our plan. Our plan is to develop full-frame lenses for Sony E mount, and in the future we will have more E mount lenses. But it takes time. Normally it takes about two years to develop one lens, sometimes three. So even if I start the process now, the lens might come out in two years time.

Sigma's new Art-series lenses have a degree of weather-sealing - why now?

It’s based on customer demand. Some of our customers said that rain and snow sometimes got into the lens mount, so they wanted sealing. And the other reason is that it’s becoming a trend. Other manufacturers are offering sealed mounts.

Does that make the design process more complex?

No, not really. The only seal is around the lens mount. It’s not a perfect weather-proofing like our Sports series. The 150-600mm for instance has sealing everywhere, on the focus ring and zoom ring.

Of the lenses in the Global Vision line, which were the most complex to bring to market?

Our 12-24mm zoom. Because that lenses uses a very large aspherical element, and at the time, no other company was producing an element of this kind, and there were no machines capable of producing it. So we designed a custom machine to make that element. But as a result of developing that technology, we were able to create this new 14mm F1.8.

The Sigma 12-24mm ultra-wide zoom is a complex design, containing a very large aspherical (front) element.
The Global Vision line is almost five years old. What are you most proud of?

Firstly, I’m still not satisfied. We need to do more. But these days, I’m pretty happy that people regard Sigma as a high-quality company. In the past, some people regarded Sigma as just another third-party lens manufacturer, and maybe even as a cheap, low-quality lens supplier. But people’s perception has been changing, gradually, and I’m very happy about that.

One of the things that professional Canon and Nikon photographers rely on is the support networks for service, like CPS and NPS. Is a professional service support system something that Sigma is interested in creating?

I think we’ll have to. In Japan we’ve already started a pro support project, and I hope we can create a global professional support system very soon.

In the past you’ve expressed concern that you don’t want Sigma to grow too much, too quickly, because this might threaten some the magic of being a small company. Is this something that you’re still worried about?

Growing too fast is not good. We need to grow, but we should grow gradually. We need to develop our capability to produce higher-quality products. That’s the priority. Then turnover, and sales, and profit will follow. We do not prioritize making the company bigger. We focus on product quality, and technology.

Over the past five years, we’ve actually been making fewer lenses, because we decreased the number of cheaper lenses we were producing. But we’ve expanded our manufacturing capacity, because the higher-end lenses use more glass. Cheaper lenses might use 10-15 elements, but these higher quality lenses use 15-20, sometimes even more elements. So more capacity is needed to make a single lens. We’ve actually invested massively in the past five years.

Sigma and Fujifilm have recently introduced lineups of cine lenses. How much growth do you see in this segment?

We don’t know. Even before I decided to get into the cine lens market, I tried to collect market data, but there’s no data out there. It’s not available. It’s only anecdotal. But we guessed that this segment will grow in the future.

Video has lower resolution demands than stills, but we’ve been designing lenses for 36+ megapixel sensors for several years. That is equivalent to 8K, in video terms. A lot of traditional cine lenses aren’t that high resolution. Our lenses might be more affordable, but they’re top quality.

The Sigma Cine lens range includes a geared version of the company's 18-35mm F1.8, now known as the 18-35mm T2. The lens covers the Super 35 format and requires a roughly 350 degree rotation to zoom from 18-35mm, allowing very precise control.
Do you have a market share target for your cine lenses?

No, we’re waiting to see how the market develops. We can dream, but it’s not the same thing!

Editors' note:

We always enjoy speaking to Mr Yamaki, partly because on the occasions when we get the opportunity to do so, it's usually because he's just unveiled something really interesting. Mostly though, we enjoy speaking to Sigma's CEO because he's a nice guy. Open, honest, and candid about Sigma's plans and ambitions, Mr Yamaki is well-liked in the photography industry, even by his competitors.

Speaking of competitors, I get the feeling that Mr Yamaki was compelled to deliver the new 14mm F1.8 partly out of a general disappointment with the available options for photographers. Sigma has a strong history of innovating in the wide and ultra-wide market, and the new 14mm, alongside the previously-released 12-24mm certainly look like a confident statement of intent. If the 14mm is as good as Mr Yamaki claims (and we are rarely disappointed by the optical performance of Sigma's Art series) it looks set to be a reference lens for landscape, architectural and astrophotographers. We're hoping to be able to post a gallery of samples very soon - watch this space.

Also interesting, is another statement of intent - Sigma's move into affordable cine lenses. While the company is not competing (yet) with the Arris of this world, or with Canon's Cinema EOS optics, Sigma (like Fujifilm) sees an opportunity to cater to a newer generation of videographers who are working with mirrorless systems. Optically, Sigma's cine lenses should be top notch, although being based on existing stills lens designs, we're told that some qualities, such as focus breathing, might cause issues for professional broadcast and film cinematographers. There is a reason, after all, that high-end professional cine lenses can cost tens of thousands of dollars.

So what next for Sigma? We wouldn't be surprised if Mr Yamaki is working on more wideangle lenses, and following the new 24-70mm F2.8, it seems likely that the company will refresh its 70-200mm F2.8 in the near future, too. More Sony E-mount optics are also on the way, we're told, which will be welcome news to Sony a7-series users.  



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Watched! Surveillance, Art & Photography - Deutsche Welle

Arts. Watched! Surveillance, Art & Photography. Increasingly smartphones and drones are tracking our every move, blurring the boundaries between our public and private lives. A Berlin exhibition reflects on the impact of mass surveillance.



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Sunday, February 26, 2017

Casey Affleck Wins Best Actor Oscar Despite Backlash Over Sexual Harassment Allegations






For months now, the media has been taking Casey Affleck to task over his past sexual harassment allegations, which resurfaced in September in a Mashable article. But, as we predicted, it appears all the backlash over the 2010 incidents had no effect on the actor’s Oscar chances. 


At the 89th annual Academy Awards on Sunday, a teary-eyed Affleck took home the golden statue for Actor in a Leading Role for his performance in “Manchester by the Sea.” He made no mention of the controversy during his speech, but did have this to say:


“Man, I wish I had something bigger and more meaningful to say.”



There’s no doubt Affleck gives one of the best on-screen performances of the year in Kenneth Lonergan’s film about a man who becomes the guardian of his teenage nephew following the untimely death of his brother. But in this day and age, must we celebrate and honor an artist when unsettling personal transgressions haunt our perception of that person? 


In 2010, Affleck was accused of harassing two women on the set of the Joaquin Phoenix mockumentary “I’m Still Here,” which he directed. One of the women was Amanda White, a producer with whom he had worked for 10 years, and the other was the movie’s director of photography, Magdalena Gorka. Both claimed they were subject to inappropriate sexual comments and unwelcome advances, which you can read more about here. At the time, Affleck denied the allegations and countersued, but later settled the case out of court to the apparent satisfaction of all involved parties. But after this year’s Oscar race heated up, his unsavory past was brought to light again, spawning think piece after think piece. Due to the terms of his settlement, Affleck is not legally allowed to address the incidents ― not that he would anyway. Some of the only words he uttered on the issue were to The New York Times in November.


“It was settled to the satisfaction of all. I was hurt and upset — I am sure all were — but I am over it,” he told NYT. “It was an unfortunate situation — mostly for the innocent bystanders of the families of those involved.”


Although the conversations we’re having about this case are very much warranted, they apparently happened a little too late, as despite it all, Affleck took home the Oscar, BAFTA, Golden Globe, Critic’s Choice, Gotham and National Board of Review awards for his performance in “Manchester.” The only major award he lost was the SAG for Best Actor, which Denzel Washington won for “Fences.” 


All this being said, we must use this situation as a lesson moving forward. Let’s speak out against casting notices and hold studios accountable for hiring alleged harassers from the get-go. Yes, Affleck won the Oscar, but “Manchester by the Sea” also succeeded at the box office, earning over $46 million domestically. Moviegoers championed the film, and most likely enjoyed it.


As we’ve said before, the media can make an impact by pinpointing the right time to start a discussion.

-- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.



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Rockwell Exhibit Displays Student Photography Projects - My Twin Tiers.com

The latest project called "The Extraordinary Pinhole Photography Student Exhibit" features the work of fourth-grade students of Hugh Gregg and Winfield Street Elementary Schools. Students had the opportunity to construct their own pinhole cameras and ...



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How I transformed an ordinary girl into Supergirl

  The response to the Supergirl image I posted on social media a few days back has been amazing. DIY Photography contacted me and asked me to do a write-up for their readers. The shoot For every project I do, I create mood board with inspiration and reference images for the subject. This mood board […]

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How I transformed an ordinary girl into Supergirl

  The response to the Supergirl image I posted on social media a few days back has been amazing. DIY Photography contacted me and asked me to do a write-up for their readers. The shoot For every project I do, I create mood board with inspiration and reference images for the subject. This mood board […]

The post How I transformed an ordinary girl into Supergirl appeared first on DIY Photography.



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German wildlife photography | Euromaxx Videos | DW.COM | 24.02 ... - Deutsche Welle

Wildlife photographers don't have to travel to faraway places to find exciting subjects. 26 German photographers have contributed fascinating and often ...

and more »


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Are there only two types of photographers?

I will probably get a bunch of hate for this post but whatever. Hopefully, my message will help some of you. I realise this website is filled with enthusiasts, professionals, camera geeks, etc… but this post is pointed more at people that want to make it as a portrait or fashion photographer. I’m a photographer […]

The post Are there only two types of photographers? appeared first on DIY Photography.



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Are there only two types of photographers?

I will probably get a bunch of hate for this post but whatever. Hopefully, my message will help some of you. I realise this website is filled with enthusiasts, professionals, camera geeks, etc… but this post is pointed more at people that want to make it as a portrait or fashion photographer. I’m a photographer […]

The post Are there only two types of photographers? appeared first on DIY Photography.



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Things we found at CP+ 2017 which had been cut in half

Things we found at CP+ 2017 which had been cut in half

We'll be honest - the past year has been pretty rough. It's hard to find much good news out there, and it seems like the world is more divided than ever. With so much uncertainty in so many areas of our lives, it's important to hold on firmly to the important things. Friends, family, lifebelts, and amusing-looking 19th century cameras (snigger snigger) but most of all, traditions. 

Here at DPReview we take tradition seriously. Every new years eve, Rishi drinks a pint of beer*. Every Easter, Carey gets a haircut. And every February, at CP+, we post a gallery of things we found at the show which have been cut in half.

So dim the lights, put on some Enya and settle in, because it's that time again.

* Most of a pint of beer.

Things we found at CP+ 2017 which had been cut in half

First up is the recently announced Pentax KP, a weather-sealed 24MP APS-C DSLR which features a lot of the same technology as the full-frame K-1. We know what you're thinking - this KP might have its innards exposed for all the world to see, but it hasn't been cut in half! How am I supposed to trust DPReview? It hasn't been the same since Phil left! Where is the Leica M9 review???

Things we found at CP+ 2017 which had been cut in half

Not so fast. Don't worry - we know what you came here to see, and we would never disappoint you (unless you really are still waiting for the M9 review, in which case we're definitely going to disappoint you). 

Here's a KP without any weather sealing at all, because it's been cut in half. It's positively begging for dust and moisture incursion.

Things we found at CP+ 2017 which had been cut in half

Also distinctly vulnerable to the elements is this Canon EF Canon EF 200-400mm f/4L IS USM. A regular on the 'things that have been cut in half', trade show circuit, Canon seems to really enjoy taking these 200-400mm lenses apart and showing off their insides.

We're starting to worry, to be honest.

Things we found at CP+ 2017 which had been cut in half

It's just gratuitous, at this point.

Things we found at CP+ 2017 which had been cut in half

We have to admit though, when it comes to showing off lens components, Canon does a good job. These are aspherical lenses, from (L-R) the company's 14mm F2.8 II, 85mm F1.2 II, 17-40mm F4, 16-35mm F2.8 II (last generation) and EF-S 15-55mm F2.8, respectively.

We were hoping to see the new 16-35mm F2.8 III represented in this display, but no such luck. If you really want to see an impressive aspherical element though, check out the 10-24mm F4, on display at CP+ 2015.

Things we found at CP+ 2017 which had been cut in half

The 16-35mm F2.8 III might have been missing from Canon's aspherical mushroom farm, but Canon didn't let us down - here it is, in another display case, with all of its many elements on show. This latest version of the 16-35mm is favorite of landscape photographers and a stellar performer, outperforming its predecessors in every respect.

Good luck getting nice-looking sunstars out of this one, though. It's been cut in half.

Things we found at CP+ 2017 which had been cut in half

Tamron's new 70-200mm F2.8 'G2' has been completely redesigned, with a new optical design consisting of 23 elements in 17 groups. These include extra low dispersion and low dispersion elements to reduce chromatic aberrations. Stabilization has been improved too, and now offers up to five stops of compensation.

This lens is 50% lighter than shipping samples, so in theory, it should be even more hand-holdable.

Things we found at CP+ 2017 which had been cut in half

Not to be outdone, Nikon is showing off a another high-tech, multi-element 70-200mm of its own - the new, and very nice 70-200mm F2.8E.

We've been impressed by the performance of this new telezoom, both optically and in terms of image stabilization, but we won't be getting on the waiting list for this 100th anniversary special addition. It looks like Nikon got a bit carried away with the weight-saving.

Things we found at CP+ 2017 which had been cut in half

Speaking of lightweight, Panasonic's DC GH5 is a modestly-sized powerhouse, combining an advanced video feature set with impressive speed, resolution and autofocus performance for stills photography. We're currently working on an in-depth review but we're glad that Panasonic didn't send us this one. It seems to have exploded.

Things we found at CP+ 2017 which had been cut in half

Voigtlander really outdid itself this year, when it came to things that had been cut in half. Here's the Nokton F1.1 for Leica M mount. Normally a useful lens for extreme low light imaging on film and digital rangefinders, we'd recommend passing on this one if you see it on Ebay.

It's decentered.

Things we found at CP+ 2017 which had been cut in half

Another Voigtlander - the 10mm F5.6 Heliar Ultra-Wide. The second native E-Mount lens made by Voigtlander and at the time of its release, the widest rectilinear lens ever produced, this one has been put together using even more aspherical elements than normal.

Things we found at CP+ 2017 which had been cut in half

Another 15mm, this is the LAOWA 15mm F4 Wide Angle 1:1 Macro - an impressive, inexpensive but undeniably niche optic, we'd describe this lens's internal construction as 'industrial'. Or 'industrial accident', in the case of this example, which has been partly - but not entirely - cut in half.

Things we found at CP+ 2017 which had been cut in half

Sony can always be relied upon for some high-quality tradeshow bisection, and this year was no different. It's easy to forget that despite its size and form-factor, the SLT-A99 II does not contain a pentaprism, and seeing it cut in half (here with a 24-70mm F2.8 attached) reveals a surprising amount of empty space above the fixed mirror.

Admittedly, this one has 50% as much empty space inside it as a regular A99 II, because as you can see, it has been cut in half.

Things we found at CP+ 2017 which had been cut in half

That's it for another year - thanks for reading, and we hope you've enjoyed our show content from CP+. It's time for lunch. Or breakfast. Quite honestly we're still a bit confused about what timezone we're in.

Until next time - keep it demi. 



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