Friday, September 30, 2016

Watch The Magical Moment A Whale Breaches Right Next To Swimmers

Watching a whale breach can be a magical experience. But watching a whale leap into the air mere feet away from you as you swim in the ocean? That’s a once-in-a-lifetime event.


Photographer Beau Pilgrim was on a snorkel tour with Swimming with Gentle Giants in Tonga last week when the incredible happened: A humpback whale plunged right past him, flying into the air before diving back into the sea.


“It was the most surreal and incredible experience,” Pilgrim wrote on his photography Facebook page.


His high-definition footage of the rare encounter shows the power and grace of the marine mammal, which has been known to grow up to 60 feet and weigh up to 80,000 pounds. 





“It was a rush of adrenaline,” Pilgrim told 9News. “Everyone was just hooting and cheering at each other.”


However magical the moment appeared to be, it’s fortunate that Pilgrim and his fellow divers weren’t injured during by the massive mammal, which weighed an estimated 44 tons.


The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administrative warns whale watchers to stay at least 100 yards from a humpback whale, as they can behave unpredictably.


Pilgrim, however, just happened to be at the right place ― safely ― at the right time.


“I spent about an hour in the water with this inquisitive, playful newborn calf,” he wrote in a separate Facebook post. “It was breaching, spy-hopping and having almost as much fun as I was.”


Below, check out Pilgrim’s incredibly detailed photos.









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Retrospective Photography Exhibit by Fred Ward Showcases a Life's Work - Westside Today

The Malibu Cultural Arts Commission's second public art installation in City Hall features a retrospective photography exhibit highlighting the work of the renowned, award-winning historic photographer Fred Ward. The opening reception, which is free ...

and more »


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Weekly Photography Challenge – Blue

Color is an important element of composition in photography. Cool colors have a very different feeling then do warm colors. See how the color blue appears in some images here.

Tim Green

By Tim Green

Weekly Photography Challenge – Blue

This week we challenge you to find and photography some subjects which are blue. Then photograph it in a compelling way. Remember to consider lighting, composition, and center of interest to create a unique image.

Neil Tackaberry

By Neil Tackaberry

Di_Chap

By Di_Chap

Alvaro

By Alvaro

Darlene Hildebrandt

By Darlene Hildebrandt

Share your images below:

Simply upload your shot into the comment field (look for the little camera icon in the Disqus comments section) and they’ll get embedded for us all to see or if you’d prefer, upload them to your favorite photo-sharing site and leave the link to them. Show me your best images in this week’s challenge. Sometimes it takes a while for an image to appear so be patient and try not to post the same image twice.

Share in the dPS Facebook Group

You can also share your images on the dPS Facebook group as the challenge is posted there each week as well.

The post Weekly Photography Challenge – Blue by Darlene Hildebrandt appeared first on Digital Photography School.



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Photographers Upset by ‘Ask First’ Stickers at BDSM Folsom Street Fair

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The Ask First Campaign is not primarily about photography, it’s about consent. But when the campaign’s popular stickers and their message was recently applied to photographers taking pictures of people at a public BDSM fair without asking, the proverbial claws came out.

The Folsom Street Fair is an annual BDSM and fetish event held in San Francisco, CA every September. It caps off Leather Pride Week and, as you might have already guessed, is extremely not safe for work. It’s also where the idea for the Ask First Campaign was born when creator Maxine Holloway found herself being groped and prodded by complete strangers who definitely didn’t have permission to do any of those things.

Instead of leaving never to return to an event like this again, Holloway created the Ask First Campaign, which passes out stickers and temporary tattoos with the slogan written on them and promotes the idea of consent in public places. They’ve passed out thousands of their stickers since the campaign launched in 2014, and last year they even set up an Ask First Photo Booth at the fair for people to pose with the stickers.

You may have seen them around, not only at the Folsom Street Fair, but even at more mainstream events like Burning Man.

ask16

So what does this have to do with photography? In the age of smartphone cameras, facial recognition software, and the Internet, Holloway believes the idea of consent in public places has everything to do with photography. It’s also something that bumps up against the legal right to take pictures in a public space.

It’s this tension that Holloway receives angry emails from photographers about, and it’s what sparked this rant by a photographer named Tony Perez. Last Saturday, as people were preparing to head out to this year’s Folsom Street Fair, Perez took to Facebook to vent his frustration over the stickers (in rather colorful language).

His status, screenshot below, has gone viral:

askfirstrant

Strong language aside, Perez is, of course, 100% in the clear legally. The debate that his reaction has sparked, however, is less about whether or not he’s standing on solid legal ground, but solid moral or ethical grounds.

We reached out to Holloway—who told SFist she’s received several emails from photographers that mirror Perez’s reaction—to ask her what she thinks.

You can find her response below:

I think photographer’s that have this type of response are entitled and obtuse. Consent is important and is about more than just sex. As a photographer myself, I believe there are three things we need to consider when thinking about consent and the camera:

  1. The “legal right” right to photograph someone in public is irrelevant. One only has to look to the recent Brock Avery Case to understand that the law does not always allocate what is right, just, or consensual.
  2. Street photography has changed since the days of Gary Winnogrand taking photos on the streets of NYC in the 60’s. The internet, cell phone cameras, and facial recognition technology is a game changer when it comes to ethics and standards of street photography. The repercussions of someone being identified on the internet at the Folsom Street Fair versus being identified at a music festival, and where that image can travel, deserves a more nuanced conversation. As culture changes, the ‘how and why’ we capture people’s image is necessary discourse.
  3. The Ask First Campaign is also addressing the fact that nowadays everyone has a camera in their hands. At events like the Folsom Street Fair, people are using cameras in offending ways: SLR’s and cell phones are repeatedly forced into people’s personal space when taking “up-skirt” photos and snapping close-up pictures of people’s breasts.

These three things are not separate, and are all indicative of people believing they are owed or have the right to someone’s body. This is eerily similar to how our society excuses sexual violence and rape culture at large. I have very little empathy or tolerance for that type of ‘entitlement’ rational, weather it is about someone’s body or image.

This is why Holloway has extended the Ask First campaign to include what she calls “consensual photography.” She’s even published a set of guidelines to help photographers navigate these admittedly charged waters when attending an event like the Folsom Street Fair:


A photo posted by Ask First (@askfirstcampaign) on Sep 24, 2016 at 3:17pm PDT

This conversation is not a comfortable one to have, but it’s one photographers should have.

One the one hand are those who believe you wave your right to any kind of privacy when you step into a public space, and limiting photography in any public space is a slippery slope. On the other are those who believe this is an issue that is easily navigated by considering the bounds of courtesy and common sense—in other words, “ask first.”

What side of the debate you fall on is up to you, one thing is for sure though: any public debate about photographers and photography is one photographers need to be a part of.

Image credits: Photographs by Cat Donohue and Courtney Trouble, respectively. Used courtesy of the Ask First Campaign.



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Atlanta Celebrates Photography Turns City Into Giant Gallery - WABE 90.1 FM

Fall brings Atlantans a photo feast as Atlanta Celebrates Photography kicks off its 18th annual festival with a smorgasbord of exhibits, gallery receptions, artist talks, lectures and special events throughout the state. The festival has more than 100 ...



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Mafia memoirs, photography exhibition highlight September Final Friday - Wichita Eagle

Jon D'Amore, who was intimately connected with the New Jersey mafia (though not directly involved), will speak about life in the mob Friday night at Murillo Studios, 119 N. Mead, as part of Final Friday. D'Amore wrote the novel, “The Boss Always Sits ...



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A house within a house in Slovakia unfolds in layers

The building is located in Bernolákovo, a village and municipality in Western Slovakia. Sitting on a site surrounded by detached houses and garden plots, the house is set back from the street and provides a high level of privacy for its owners.

Related: Modern barn-inspired house in Slovakia is filled with natural light and passive solar power

The central layer comprises basic dwelling spaces laid out in a Palladian 3x3 grid with a slightly lowered dining room. The outer layer houses different-sized patios, a garage, a swimming pool, and storage areas. This layer acts as an in-between space that serves as a mediator between the central functions and the garden spaces conceived as two distinct environments. While the one in front of the house looks like an informal space, the rear garden has a more functional quality.

+ Plural

Via Plataforma Arquitectura

Photos by Daniela Dostálková

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Jacques Torres Welcomes Son Pierre

Jacques Torres Son Pierre
Lola Melani Photography

There’s a new little sweetie in line for the Mr. Chocolate crown!

Master pastry chef Jacques Torres and his wife, chocolatier Hasty Torres, welcomed son Pierre Torres in New York City on Friday, Aug. 19, at 8:57 a.m., his rep confirms to PEOPLE.

Baby Pierre weighed in at 6 lbs., 3 oz. and measured 18.7 inches at birth.

“By far my most precious creation I’ve ever made arrived on Friday morning, just when our warm chocolate croissants were coming out of the oven,” the new dad, 57, wrote on Instagram.

“Meet my son Pierre, he completes my life. Merci Wifey @madame_chocolat I love you!” he added, tacking on the hashtags, “#MyLittleBonbon,” “#ChocolatePrince,” “#PrincePierre” and “#BeauàCroquer.”

Want all the latest pregnancy and birth announcements, plus celebrity mom blogs? Click here to get those and more in the PEOPLE Babies newsletter.

Instagram Photo

In photos shared exclusively with PEOPLE, it looks like baby Pierre might be a mini pastry chef with his culinary-inspired photo shoot.

In one shot, Jacques can be seen cradling his newborn while in another Pierre is sound asleep — while sporting a chef hat!

Jacques Torres Son Pierre
Lola Melani Photography

Jacques Torres Son Pierre
Lola Melani Photography

Jacques Torres Son Pierre
Lola Melani Photography

Pierre is the first child for the couple, who were married in 2007. Jacques, who grew up in France and began opening his own shops in 2000, has nine stores in the New York City area.

According to The Observer, the couple recently expanded their home base to make space for their new arrival, with Jacques selling his Hell’s Kitchen condo in favor of a 2,500-square-foot space on the Upper East Side.

“He’s such a great person,” Dennis Ding, a broker for N.Y.C. real-estate firm Nest Seekers, told The Observer in March of Jacques. “They’re so happy! A new apartment and a new baby!”

— Jen Juneau with reporting by Megan Stein




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First look at Case Air App and hands on with Case Air

Looking at the Tether Tools Case Air was an interesting experience. It promises the same Camranger experience at half the cost, and a significantly lighter package.  (we covered its kickoff here) I have used the Camranger before on tradeshows and it was very smooth. The Case Air appears to be no different. It provides several nice [...]

The post First look at Case Air App and hands on with Case Air appeared first on DIY Photography.



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First look at Case Air App and hands on with Case Air

Looking at the Tether Tools Case Air was an interesting experience. It promises the same Camranger experience at half the cost, and a significantly lighter package.  (we covered its kickoff here) I have used the Camranger before on tradeshows and it was very smooth. The Case Air appears to be no different. It provides several nice [...]

The post First look at Case Air App and hands on with Case Air appeared first on DIY Photography.



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In Defense Of Flash: 5 Reasons to Move Beyond Natural Light Photography

defenseofflash_feat

Flash is a complicated beast, let’s put it that way.

Say you’ve spent the last few years of your photography journey perfecting natural light, and you know the exposure triangle by heart. Flash comes in to the picture and ruins that perfect triangle, making it more of an exposure square.

Where once you could take on all ambient light challenges, flash messes up your previous knowledge base and confuses you from the start. Now you have a bunch of extra factors to consider: your flash power, intensity, direction, modifiers, ambient-to-flash-ratios, fill ratios, and relative size. Did I say its a square? More like an exposure decagon.

Now would be the perfect time to turn around and walk away, but if you’re still interested to know why I think flash is worth learning, read on.

1. It’s not that hard.

Sure, it takes a while to learn how each modification to your lighting affects your image, but you’ve already learned so much about photography, this is just the next step. Simple trial and error is all it takes to realize how versatile having flash can be.

Have you ever had to spend time in Photoshop lightening a persons face because it wasn’t lit enough? Flash is there to help you. Have you had blurry motion because it was too dark, making you drop down to a slow shutter speed? Flash is there to help you. Just purchasing a flash with off-camera capabilities will open up a whole new world of wonder/terror… and only by learning can you control the beast.

Go from ambient alone, where everything is bathed in an orange glow.Go from ambient alone, where everything is bathed in an orange glow. To adding a single flash, camera right. This lets the subjects pop against the warm background.To adding a single flash, camera right. This lets the subjects pop against the warm background. 2. It’s not that expensive.

Sure, you can pick up some amazing flash units like the £1,600 Profoto B1 heads, but you can also pick up some little Yongnuo YN-560 flashguns for £50.

Unless you’re trying to illuminate large swathes of an outdoor scene, you won’t need those big flashes. I’ve used my cheap Yongnuo flashgun for the past four years commercially and its never let me down. Buy a few of them with triggers and you can start to play around with off-camera flash lighting, which is the holy grail of photographic lighting.

Having multiple flashes illuminating different parts of the scene is much more preferable to having one huge singular flash lighting up everything.

3. You can light so it doesn’t look lit.

This is a technique that’s hard to explain, but easy to show. Unless you’re in a pitch black room at night, there’s going to be some ambient light that your camera can see.

For the first step, dial in a setting so that your camera starts to pick up that ambient light, however weak it may be (think back to the exposure triangle). Now that that’s done, bring your flashgun in on lowest power, and fire off a shot. Next, start ramping up the flashes power (leave those camera settings alone), until the flash blends in with the ambient.

It will blend eventually, and if you want to then bring your ambient down a little bit read on to the next point.

Ambient light is coming through the window, but the shadow areas are looking dark in comparison and needed a boost.Ambient light is coming through the window, but the shadow areas are looking dark in comparison and needed a boost. By adding a flash at full power camera left, we get a mix of flash and ambient cross-lighting, illuminating the subjects and giving dramatic shadows.By adding a flash at full power camera left, we get a mix of flash and ambient cross-lighting, illuminating the subjects and giving dramatic shadows. 4. You can adjust ambient light to taste with one dial.

This is true on every camera ever made that can shoot with flash. Say you’ve gotten to that perfect mix of ambient light and flash, and you’ve fired off a few test shots. Suddenly, the sun comes out from behind a cloud and that ambient you worked so hard for gets brighter, and messes with your exposure. Fear not, a simple technique will fix this: your shutter speed.

Moving the shutter speed settings around will not affect the flash power, or how much flash power is coming in to the camera, it’ll just restrict the amount (or let in more) of the ambient light around.

When I figured this out it blew my mind. There’s a simple dial on my camera I can twizzle that can affect one part of the two piece ambient-flash exposure. Now I can choose how bright I want my wall lights to be in a picture, or how much glow I want from a candle. You think by slowing down the shutter speed will cause your subjects to blur slightly if moving? Not with flash! The flash freezes the subject that its pointing at, so this is really a win-win-win situation.

Use that shutter speed as much as possible to control that ambient, just don’t go above the sync speed for the flash.

The shutter speed was at 1/60, with a flash upstairs and in the kitchen. Daylight was streaming through the door on the right.The shutter speed was at 1/60, with a flash upstairs and in the kitchen. Daylight was streaming through the door on the right. Slowing the shutter to 1/30, twice as much ambient light fills the picture, lightening the shadows without the need for post-production.Slowing the shutter to 1/30, twice as much ambient light fills the picture, lightening the shadows without the need for post-production. 5. It can define a feeling.

I love using flash (can you guess), finding out how different colours, sizes, and directions of flash can give a picture a completely different mood.

By just having a small flashgun in a different room, you can take an image from one dimensional to two. You can now light to accentuate a mood, to highlight certain things. It takes you beyond capturing what’s in front of you; now you can use flash to guide the viewers eye to different parts of the picture.

Yours truly testing the trigger on a small Yongnuo 560 flashgun, before placing in the back room.Yours truly testing the trigger on a small Yongnuo 560 flashgun, before placing in the back room. Firing the flash into a blue wall gave the room a cold tone, contrasting with the warm colours of the front room.Firing the flash into a blue wall gave the room a cold tone, contrasting with the warm colours of the front room.

Give flash a go… you might just like it. And ignore the Internet videos that show you the “right way” to light an image; go it alone, test and test again, find out what works for you and add flash to your gear bag. There is no right way, there is no wrong way. There is only what you think looks good.

About the author: Jon Sparkman is a Cheltenham, UK based fine art photographer. He discovered his love for using flash completely by accident and now centers his work around conveying a message through his photography. You can find his work on his website or by following him on Instagram and Twitter.



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18 Tranquil Images of Blue to Cool Your Thoughts

Different colors evoke different emotions and have a different feeling to them. Warm colors like red, orange and yellow feel alive and vibrant. Cool colors like purple, green and blue feel calming and relaxing.

Here is an image collection of various different photographers use of the color blue. View each and see how they make you feel. Do these blue images have a calming effect on you? I feel more relaxed just looking them.

I’ll start off with three of my images from the “blue” city of Chefchaouen in Morocco.

morocco-2016-0610-1100px

morocco-2016-0649-1100px

morocco-2016-0678-1100px

Andy

By Andy

Nick Klein

By Nick Klein

Matt Bradley

By Matt Bradley

Xavier

By Xavier

Pablo Fernández

By Pablo Fernández

Maarten Takens

By Maarten Takens

Alain Tremblay

By alain tremblay

Julian E...

By Julian E…

Martin Fisch

By Martin Fisch

Geir Tønnessen

By geir tønnessen

Modes Rodríguez

By Modes Rodríguez

Mirai Takahashi

By Mirai Takahashi

Genji Arakaki

By Genji Arakaki

Hansel And Regrettal

By Hansel and Regrettal

Davide D'Amico

By Davide D’Amico

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